Reversed or chaotic diurnal sleep rhythms

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Many patients with ME/CFS end up with circadian abnormalities ranging from severe delayed sleep phase to non 24 hour circadian rhythm disorder to apparent loss of regular circadian rhythms.

Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders, irregular sleep-wake type, G47.23, Sleep and Wake Time one week in a person without ME/CFS

Canadian Consensus Criteria[edit | edit source]

The Canadian Consensus Criteria (CCC) for ME/CFS states that some form of sleep dysfunction will be present in almost all ME/CFS patients, and includes sleep dysfunction not caused by sleep apnea as a diagnostic criteria.[1] "Reversed or chaotic diurnal sleep rhythms" are examples of sleep dysfunction involving circadian rhythm disruption, and are listed as a possible manifestation of sleep dysfunction in the Canadian Consensus Criteria for ME/CFS.[1] At least one form of sleep dysfunction is required for diagnosis according to the Canadian Consensus Criteria.

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

circadian rhythm Physical, mental, and behavioral changes that follow a 24-hour cycle, responding mostly to light and dark. Controlled the brain's hypothalamus. (Learn more: www.nigms.nih.gov)

circadian rhythm Physical, mental, and behavioral changes that follow a 24-hour cycle, responding mostly to light and dark. Controlled the brain's hypothalamus. (Learn more: www.nigms.nih.gov)

Canadian Consensus Criteria (CCC) - A set of diagnostic criteria used to diagnose ME/CFS, developed by a group of practicing ME/CFS clinicians in 2003. The CCC is often considered to be the most complex criteria, but possibly the most accurate, with the lowest number of patients meeting the criteria. Led to the development of the International Consensus Criteria (ICC) in 2011.

Canadian Consensus Criteria (CCC) - A set of diagnostic criteria used to diagnose ME/CFS, developed by a group of practicing ME/CFS clinicians in 2003. The CCC is often considered to be the most complex criteria, but possibly the most accurate, with the lowest number of patients meeting the criteria. Led to the development of the International Consensus Criteria (ICC) in 2011.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.