Severe acute respiratory syndrome

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Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome or SARS is a respiratory viral infection caused by the highly Infectious SARS-CoV coronavirus.[1][2][3] It is a potentially deadly illness that quickly spread around the world in 2003, infecting around 8,000 people, with 9.6% of those infected dying.[1] SARS causes flu-like symptoms.[4]

Symptoms[edit | edit source]

Symptoms are similar to the flu.[4]

About 1 in 5 people with SARS may also get diarrhea.[4]

Symptoms Can Worsen Fast

A dry cough can develop 2 to 7 days into the illness. This cough can keep the body from getting enough oxygen. 1 in 10 people with SARS will need a machine to help them breathe.[4]

Can Lead to Other Health Problems

  • pneumonia
  • heart failure
  • liver failure[4]

People who are over age 60 and have chronic illness like diabetes or hepatitis are most likely to have these problems.[4]

Methods of transmission[edit | edit source]

The coronavirus that causes SARS can be transmitted by droplets containing the virus during close contact, from touching surfaces containing droplets, or from respiratory droplets in the air.[3]
Source: Xiao et al. 2017. PLoS ONE 12(7): e0181558.

ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

Lam et al. (2009) conducted a large long-term follow up of people needing hospital treatment for SARS in Hong Kong, and found that 40% reported chronic fatigue, and 27% of them and met the CDC's criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome one year after recovery from SARS.[5] This study found that the use of corticosteroids (steroids) in treating SARS was not associated with an increased likelihood of chronic fatigue, and the high rates of psychiatric problems did not explain high rates of chronic fatigue.[5]

Moldofsky et al. (2011) assessed 21 survivors of SARS from Toronto, Canada, who remained too ill to return to work, stating that chronic post-SARS was similar to fibromyalgia.[6]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2011, Chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, depression and disordered sleep in chronic post-SARS syndrome; a case-controlled study[6]
  • 2010, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and Coronavirus - (Full text)
  • 2004, Pulmonary function and exercise capacity in survivors of severe acute respiratory syndrome (Full text)
  • 2009, Mental Morbidities and Chronic Fatigue in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Survivors: Long-term Follow-up[5] - (Full text)
  • 2003, Consensus document on the epidemiology of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)[7] - (Full text)

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.1 Warnes, Sarah L.; Little, Zoë R.; Keevil, C. William (Nov 10, 2015). "Human Coronavirus 229E Remains Infectious on Common Touch Surface Materials". mBio. 6 (6). doi:10.1128/mBio.01697-15. ISSN 2150-7511. PMC 4659470Freely accessible. PMID 26556276. 
  2. Hui, David S.C.; Chan, Paul K.S. (Sep 2010). "Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and Coronavirus". Infectious Disease Clinics of North America. 24 (3): 619–638. doi:10.1016/j.idc.2010.04.009. ISSN 0891-5520. PMC 7127710Freely accessible. PMID 20674795. 
  3. 3.03.1 Xiao, Shenglan; Li, Yuguo; Wong, Tze-wai; Hui, David S. C. (Jul 20, 2017). "Role of fomites in SARS transmission during the largest hospital outbreak in Hong Kong". PLOS ONE. 12 (7): e0181558. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0181558. ISSN 1932-6203. PMC 5519164Freely accessible. PMID 28727803. 
  4. 4.04.14.24.34.44.54.6 "SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome): Symptoms, Causes, Treatment". WebMD. Retrieved Mar 28, 2020. 
  5. 5.05.15.2 Lam, Marco Ho-Bun; Wing, Yun-Kwok; Yu, Mandy Wai-Man; Leung, Chi-Ming; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Kong, Alice P. S.; So, W. Y.; Fong, Samson Yat-Yuk; Lam, Siu-Ping (Dec 14, 2009). "Mental Morbidities and Chronic Fatigue in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Survivors: Long-term Follow-up". Archives of Internal Medicine. 169 (22): 2142–2147. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2009.384. ISSN 0003-9926. 
  6. 6.06.1 Moldofsky, Harvey; Patcai, John (Mar 24, 2011). "Chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, depression and disordered sleep in chronic post-SARS syndrome; a case-controlled study". BMC Neurology. 11 (1): 37. doi:10.1186/1471-2377-11-37. ISSN 1471-2377. PMC 3071317Freely accessible. PMID 21435231. 
  7. World Health Organization (2003). "Consensus document on the epidemiology of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). No. WHO/CDS/CSR/GAR/2003.11" (PDF). World Health Organization. 

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a U.S. government agency dedicated to epidemiology and public health. It operates under the auspices of the Department of Health and Human Services.

chronic fatigue (CF) - Persistent and abnormal fatigue is a symptom, not an illness. It may be caused by depression, multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome or many other illnesses. The term "chronic fatigue" should never be confused with the disease chronic fatigue syndrome.

World Health Organization (WHO) - "A specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with public health. It was established on 7 April 1948, and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The WHO is a member of the United Nations Development Group. Its predecessor, the Health Organization, was an agency of the League of Nations." The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) is maintained by WHO. (Learn more: en.wikipedia.org)

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.