Portal:History and People/Books Film

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Books Films

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These are selected articles about books and film about ME, which appear on Portal:History and People.




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Through the Shadowlands: A Science Writer's Odyssey into an Illness Science Doesn't Understand is a 2017 memoir by science writer Julie Rehmeyer



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Unrest is a 2017 documentary by Jennifer Brea



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Osler's Web: Inside the Labyrinth of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Epidemic is a 1996 investigative nonfiction book by Hillary Johnson



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Forgotten Plague is a 2015 documentary by Ryan Prior



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Love and Fatigue in America is a 2014 memoir by novelist Roger King



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The State of Me is a 2008 autobiographical novel by Nasim Jafry



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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Treatment Guide, 2nd Edition is a 2012 eBook by Erica Verrillo



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One Last Goodbye is a 2011 Memoir by Kay Gilderdale



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How to Be Sick is 2010 self-help book by Toni Bernhard



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The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating is a 2010 memoir by Elisabeth Tova Bailey



Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.