Nora Chapman

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Source:University of Nebraska

Nora M. Chapman, Ph.D., is a Professor in the department of Pathology and Microbiology, at the College of Medicine, University of Nebraska. Her interests are in virology and molecular biology and is part of the University's Enterovirus Research Group.[1] Dr. Chapman and her associates at the University of Nebraska are working to collabrate Dr. John Chia's work on enteroviruses being present in gut biopsies of patients with ME/CFS.[2] She serves on the Board of Directors of the Enterovirus Foundation.[3]

In a landmark 2005 paper,[4] Prof Chapman discovered the mechanism by which a normal lytic enterovirus can get transformed into an aberrant non-cytolytic virus capable of producing persistent low-level infections. The mechanism of transformation involves mutations that the virus acquires during the acute infection in the host: see non-cytolytic enterovirus. This has importance for ME/CFS, which has long been associated with persistent non-cytolytic enteroviral infections of the muscle, brain and stomach tissues.

Education[edit | edit source]

  • B.A. (Highest Honors), University of California, Santa Cruz, 1975
  • Ph.D., Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 1981

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Book chapter[edit | edit source]

  • 2008, Persistent Coxsackievirus Infection: Enterovirus Persistence in Chronic Myocarditis and Dilated Cardiomyopathy. In: Tracy S., Oberste M.S., Drescher K.M. (eds) Group B Coxsackieviruses. Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology, vol 323. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg[5](Preview)

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2002, Toward Testing the Hypothesis that Group B Coxsackieviruses (CVB) Trigger Insulin-Dependent Diabetes: Inoculating Nonobese Diabetic Mice with CVB Markedly Lowers Diabetes Incidence[6](Full Text)

See also[edit | edit source]


References[edit | edit source]

  1. http://www.unmc.edu/pathology/faculty/bios/chapman.html
  2. Research, Invest in ME. "Invest in ME Research - IIMEC5 International ME Conference 2010". Invest in ME Research. Retrieved August 8, 2018.
  3. "Our Community". Enterovirus Foundation. Retrieved August 8, 2018.
  4. Kim, K.-S.; Tracy, S.; Tapprich, W.; Bailey, J.; Lee, C.-K.; Kim, K.; Barry, W. H.; Chapman, N. M. (June 2005). "5'-Terminal deletions occur in coxsackievirus B3 during replication in murine hearts and cardiac myocyte cultures and correlate with encapsidation of negative-strand viral RNA". Journal of Virology. 79 (11): 7024–7041. doi:10.1128/JVI.79.11.7024-7041.2005. ISSN 0022-538X. PMC 1112132. PMID 15890942.
  5. Chapman, N. M.; Kim, K. -S. (2008). "Persistent Coxsackievirus Infection: Enterovirus Persistence in Chronic Myocarditis and Dilated Cardiomyopathy". Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunologyvolume=vol 323. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer. pp. 275–292. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-75546-3_13. ISBN 9783540755456.
  6. Tracy, S.; Drescher, K. M.; Chapman, N. M.; Kim, K.-S.; Carson, S. D.; Pirruccello, S.; Lane, P. H.; Romero, J. R.; Leser, J. S. (December 2002). "Toward testing the hypothesis that group B coxsackieviruses (CVB) trigger insulin-dependent diabetes: inoculating nonobese diabetic mice with CVB markedly lowers diabetes incidence". Journal of Virology. 76 (23): 12097–12111. doi:10.1128/JVI.76.23.12097-12111.2002. ISSN 0022-538X. PMID 12414951.

enterovirus A genus of RNA viruses which typically enter the body through the respiratory or gastrointestinal systems and sometimes spread to the central nervous system or other parts of the body, causing neurological, cardiac, and other damage. Since the first reports of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), enteroviruses have been suspected as a cause of ME. Enteroviruses have also been implicated as the cause of Type I diabetes, congestive heart failure, and other conditions. Enteroviruses include poliovirus, coxsackieviruses, and many others. New enteroviruses and new strains of existing enteroviruses are continuously being discovered. (Learn more: viralzone.expasy.org)

enterovirus A genus of RNA viruses which typically enter the body through the respiratory or gastrointestinal systems and sometimes spread to the central nervous system or other parts of the body, causing neurological, cardiac, and other damage. Since the first reports of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), enteroviruses have been suspected as a cause of ME. Enteroviruses have also been implicated as the cause of Type I diabetes, congestive heart failure, and other conditions. Enteroviruses include poliovirus, coxsackieviruses, and many others. New enteroviruses and new strains of existing enteroviruses are continuously being discovered. (Learn more: viralzone.expasy.org)

enterovirus A genus of RNA viruses which typically enter the body through the respiratory or gastrointestinal systems and sometimes spread to the central nervous system or other parts of the body, causing neurological, cardiac, and other damage. Since the first reports of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), enteroviruses have been suspected as a cause of ME. Enteroviruses have also been implicated as the cause of Type I diabetes, congestive heart failure, and other conditions. Enteroviruses include poliovirus, coxsackieviruses, and many others. New enteroviruses and new strains of existing enteroviruses are continuously being discovered. (Learn more: viralzone.expasy.org)

enterovirus A genus of RNA viruses which typically enter the body through the respiratory or gastrointestinal systems and sometimes spread to the central nervous system or other parts of the body, causing neurological, cardiac, and other damage. Since the first reports of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), enteroviruses have been suspected as a cause of ME. Enteroviruses have also been implicated as the cause of Type I diabetes, congestive heart failure, and other conditions. Enteroviruses include poliovirus, coxsackieviruses, and many others. New enteroviruses and new strains of existing enteroviruses are continuously being discovered. (Learn more: viralzone.expasy.org)

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

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