Nigella sativa

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Nigella sativa or black seed is a herb with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.[1][2] The active ingredient in nigella sativa is thymoquinone, and it has been investigated for a wide range of medical conditions.[1][3]

Theory[edit | edit source]

Evidence[edit | edit source]

Clinicians[edit | edit source]

Risks and safety[edit | edit source]

Costs and availability[edit | edit source]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2015, Immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory action of Nigella sativa and thymoquinone: A comprehensive review[4](Abstract)
  • 2015, Effect of vitamins C, E and nigella sativa seeds on antioxidant activity in fibromyalgia patients[5](Full text)
  • 2015, Effect of Nigella Sativa and Vitamin E on Some Oxidative / Nitrosative Biomarkers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients[6](Full text)
  • 2016, Neuropharmacological effects of Nigella sativa[7](Full text)
  • 2017, Review on Clinical Trials of Black Seed (Nigella sativa ) and Its Active Constituent, Thymoquinone[3](Full text)
  • 2020, Nigella sativa: Valuable perspective in the management of chronic diseases[2](Full text)

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.1 "Nigella sativa". Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Retrieved December 21, 2021.
  2. 2.02.1 Pop, Raluca Maria; Trifa, Adrian Pavel; Popolo, Ada; Chedea, Veronica Sanda; Militaru, Claudia; Bocsan, Ioana Corina; Buzoianu, Anca Dana (June 2020). "Nigella sativa: Valuable perspective in the management of chronic diseases". Iranian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences. 23 (6): 699–713. doi:10.22038/ijbms.2020.37734.8978. ISSN 2008-3866. PMC 7351440. PMID 32695285.
  3. 3.03.1 Tavakkoli, Alireza; Mahdian, Vahid; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein (September 2017). "Review on Clinical Trials of Black Seed (Nigella sativa ) and Its Active Constituent, Thymoquinone". Journal of Pharmacopuncture. 20 (3): 179–193. doi:10.3831/KPI.2017.20.021. ISSN 2093-6966. PMC 5633670. PMID 30087794.
  4. Majdalawieh, Amin F.; Fayyad, Muneera W. (September 2015). "Immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory action of Nigella sativa and thymoquinone: A comprehensive review". International Immunopharmacology. 28 (1): 295–304. doi:10.1016/j.intimp.2015.06.023. ISSN 1878-1705. PMID 26117430.
  5. Iqbal R, Mughal MS, Asghar MN, Shaheen N, Ahmad NM, Farman S, Saeed MA, Khan IU, Arshad M (2015). "Effect of Vitamins C, E and Nigella sativa Seeds on Antioxidant Activity in Fibromyalgia Patients" (PDF). Pakistan J. Zool. 47 (1): 7–13.
  6. http://www.lifesciencesite.com/lsj/life120715/016_29075life120715_157_162.pdf
  7. Beheshti, Farimah; Khazaei, Majid; Hosseini, Mahmoud (2016). "Neuropharmacological effects of Nigella sativa". Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine. 6 (1): 104–116. ISSN 2228-7930. PMC 4884225. PMID 27247928.

immunomodulator An immunomodulator is a substance that affects the functioning of the immune system

chronic disease a disease or condition that usually lasts for 3 months or longer and may get worse over time. Chronic diseases are long-term (typically incurable and requiring long-term management) but are not necessarily severe.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
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