National Institutes of Health funding

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United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding of research and treatment of ME/CFS has been historically low.

According to NIH, the budget in the United States for chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) for previous years is as follows:[1]

Fiscal Year 2020 - $15 million
Fiscal Year 2019 - $15 million
Fiscal Year 2018 - $14 million
Fiscal Year 2017 - $15 million
Fiscal Year 2016 - $8 million
Fiscal Year 2015 - $6 million
Fiscal Year 2014 - $5 million
Fiscal Year 2013 - $5 million
Fiscal Year 2012 - $5 million
Fiscal Year 2011 - $6 million
Fiscal Year 2010 - $6 million
Fiscal Year 2009 - $5 million
Fiscal Year 2008 - $4 million
Fiscal Year 2007 - $4 million[2]
Fiscal Year 2006 - $5 million[2]


In November 2016, NIH Director Francis Collins announced that NIH spending for research for CFS disease is intended to double to roughly $15 million in 2017, compared to the estimated $7.6 million allotted for research in 2016.[3]

NIH Research Funding[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. https://report.nih.gov/categorical_spending.aspx
  2. 2.02.1 NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT). "Biennial Report of the Director, NIH, FY 2006 & 2007". National Institutes of Health. Retrieved July 12, 2021.
  3. Wadman, Meredith (November 12, 2016). "NIH to double funding for chronic fatigue syndrome, but patient distrust remains". Science magazine. Retrieved July 12, 2021.

National Institutes of Health (NIH) - A set of biomedical research institutes operated by the U.S. government, under the auspices of the Department of Health and Human Services.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.