Julie Wilhelmy

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Julie Wilhelmy, is a Life Science Research Assistant at the Stanford Genome Technology Center, Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA and a research team member at the ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center at Stanford.[1] Her research interests include experimental genomics and immunology. Projects include: analyzing the gene expression patterns of the severely ill patients; analysis of T Cell receptors and gene expression of single cells in Mark Davis' lab; Metabolic Trap Project with Robert Phair; and energy metabolism of ME/CFS patient immune cells with Layla Cervantes.[2]

Research related to ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

  • Feb 2019, Red blood cell deformability is diminished in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[3] - (Full text)
  • Apr 2019, A nanoelectronics-blood-based diagnostic biomarker for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS)[4] - (Full text)

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "SGTC :: Staff". www-sequence.stanford.edu. Retrieved Jun 10, 2019. 
  2. "Meet Julie Wilhelmy, ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center at Stanford Team Member". Open Medicine Foundation. Jul 25, 2018. Retrieved Jun 10, 2019. 
  3. Saha, Amit K.; Schmidt, Brendan R.; Wilhelmy, Julie; Nguyen, Vy; Abugherir, Abed; Do, Justin K.; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen; Davis, Ronald W.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K. (Feb 23, 2019). "Red blood cell deformability is diminished in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation. 71 (1): 113–116. doi:10.3233/CH-180469. 
  4. Esfandyarpour, R.; Kashi, A.; Nemat-Gorgani, M.; Wilhelmy, J.; Davis, R. W. (May 21, 2019). "A nanoelectronics-blood-based diagnostic biomarker for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS)". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 116 (21): 10250–10257. doi:10.1073/pnas.1901274116. ISSN 0027-8424. 

genome - an organism’s complete set of DNA, including all of its genes

metabolic trap hypothesis - An hypothesis which proposes that the normal metabolic functioning of the cell has become "trapped" in an abnormal state, which may lead to body-wide symptoms.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.