Get Well From ME

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Get Well From ME is a video blog started by a British ME patient man named Giles Meehan. His objective is to advise on how to manage ME/CFS, encourage those who are recovering, educate about the illness, and support people with severe ME who are not getting better.[1] He got sick at the end of university with a bad case of glandular fever, caused by cytomegalovirus, and never recovered. He spent his twenties basically housebound. At his worst he couldn't walk 100 meters to the end of the road and back. As one can see in the videos, he has improved significantly.[2]

Videos and full text transcripts are available at Get Well From ME. Videos only are available at his YouTube channel GetWellFromME.

Episodes[edit | edit source]

About ME[edit | edit source]

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Videos on YouTube channel only[edit | edit source]

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myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

cytomegalovirus (CMV) - A common herpesvirus found in humans. Like other herpesviruses, it is a life-long infection that remains in a latent state inside the human body, until it is 'reactivated' by appropriate conditions. CMV infects between 60% to 70% of adults in industrialized countries and close to 100% in emerging countries. Much is unknown about this virus, although it has been found in salivary glands and myeloid blood cells such as monocytes. It has also been linked to the development of certain cancers. Congenital CMV is a leading infectious cause of deafness, learning disabilities, and intellectual disability. A common treatment for CMV is valganciclovir, commonly known as Valcyte.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.