Dorsal root ganglia

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
(Redirected from Ganglionitis)
Jump to: navigation, search
Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG)
Spinal Cord Sectional Anatomy (Note: Dorsal root and Dorsal root ganglion)

Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) is "a nodule in a dorsal root that contains cell bodies of neurons in afferent spinal nerves."[1] They lie along the posterior of the vertebral column by the spine. The dorsal root ganglia "contain the cell bodies of afferent nerve fibres (those carrying impulses toward the central nervous system); efferent neurons (carrying motor impulses away from the central nervous system) are present in the ventral root ganglia."[2]

The neuron is parted of two parts:

  1. Dendrite[3] receives the information and sends it to the Perykaron (cytoplasm which is around the nucleus).
  2. Axon[4] takes this information and sends forward.

In human disease[edit | edit source]

"This is a dorsal root ganglion (DRG) from a chicken embryo (around stage of day 7) after incubation overnight in NGF growth medium stained with anti-neurofilament antibody. Axons growing out of the ganglion are visible."[1]
Ganglionitis is inflammation of a nerve ganglion. The dorsal root ganglia can become inflamed causing severe pain and other symptoms. Conditions that can cause dorsa root ganglionitis include trauma, sciatica, compressive neuropathy, herniated disc, spinal stenosis, peripheral neuropathy, meningitis, and spinal infections[5][6], including Herpes simplex virus 1.[7]

ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

Inflammation of the dorsal root ganglia (ganglionitis) has been found in the autopsies of several very severely ill myalgic encephalomyelitis patients including Lynn Gilderdale, Sophia Mirza and Merryn Crofts.[citation needed][8][9][10]

Sjogren’s syndrome[edit | edit source]

13 Sjogren’s patients with autonomic dysfunction were found to have lymphocytic (T‐cell) infiltration in the dorsal roots and ganglia, Electrophysical studies also found involvement of the dorsal root ganglia.[11] Antiganglion autoantibodies have been detected in patients with sensory neuropathy.[11]

Learn more [edit | edit source]

  • 2014, Inflammation in dorsal root ganglia after peripheral nerve injury: Effects of the sympathetic innervation[14]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.11.2 "Dorsal root ganglia : Wikis (The Full Wiki)". www.thefullwiki.org. Retrieved Aug 13, 2018. 
  2. "Ganglion | physiology". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved Aug 13, 2018. 
  3. "Dendrite". Wikipedia. Jun 6, 2018. 
  4. "Axon". Wikipedia. Jul 23, 2018. 
  5. Ma, C.; Greenquist, K. W.; Lamotte, R. H. (Apr 2006). "Inflammatory mediators enhance the excitability of chronically compressed dorsal root ganglion neurons". Journal of Neurophysiology. 95 (4): 2098–2107. doi:10.1152/jn.00748.2005. ISSN 0022-3077. PMID 16381809. 
  6. "Dorsal Root Ganglion - RightDiagnosis.com". www.rightdiagnosis.com. Retrieved Aug 16, 2018. 
  7. Slavin, Konstantin V.; Jain, Paavani; Rathore, Ranvir S.; Rakic, Andrei M.; Rathore, Jaivir S.; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor (2017). "Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Human Cervical Dorsal Root Ganglionitis". Case Reports in Neurology. 9 (2): 188–194. doi:10.1159/000479146. ISSN 1662-680X. PMID 28966586. 
  8. Wilkinson, Damon (Apr 1, 2018). "'Bed-bound and in unimaginable pain, watching my daughter waste away and die from ME was torture'". men. Retrieved Aug 16, 2018. 
  9. Mirza, Sophia (Nov 15, 2005). "Certified Copy of an Entry - Death". sophiaandme.org.uk. City and County of Brighton and Hove. 
  10. Dr. Speedy (Apr 16, 2011). "Lynn Gilderdale's autopsy showed 'dorsal root ganglionitis' - infected nerve roots, just like Sophia Mirza's". niceguidelines.blogspot.com. 
  11. 11.011.1 Malinow, K.; Yannakakis, G. D.; Glusman, S. M.; Edlow, D. W.; Griffin, J.; Pestronk, A.; Powell, D. L.; Ramsey‐Goldman, R.; Eidelman, B. H. (1986). "Subacute sensory neuronopathy secondary to dorsal root ganglionitis in primary Sjögren's syndrome". Annals of Neurology. 20 (4): 535–537. doi:10.1002/ana.410200416. ISSN 1531-8249. 
  12. Ma, C.; Greenquist, K. W.; Lamotte, R. H. (2006). "Inflammatory mediators enhance the excitability of chronically compressed dorsal root ganglion neurons". Journal of Neurophysiology. 95 (4): 2098–2107. doi:10.1152/jn.00748.2005. ISSN 0022-3077. PMID 16381809. 
  13. "dorsal root ganglionitis - Kay Gilderdale writes of her late, severely affected, daughter:". talkhealthpartnership.com. Aug 14, 2013. 
  14. "Inflammation in dorsal root ganglia after peripheral nerve injury: Effects of the sympathetic innervation". Autonomic Neuroscience. 182: 108–117. May 1, 2014. doi:10.1016/j.autneu.2013.12.009. ISSN 1566-0702. 
  15. Rathore, Jaivir; Slavin, Konstantin; Rathore, Ranvir; Rakic, Andrei; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor (Apr 6, 2015). "Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Dorsal Root Ganglionitis in a 34 Year Old Male With Occipital Neuralgia Refractory to Medical and Radiofrequency Ablation Therapies: A Clinicopathological Report and Literature Review (P1.293)". Neurology. 84 (14 Supplement): P1.293. ISSN 0028-3878. 
  16. "Dorsal Root Ganglionitis - infection of inflammation?". Phoenix Rising ME / CFS Forums. Retrieved Aug 16, 2018. 
  17. Hart, Karen. "Histology Photomicrographs - Dorsal root ganglion". eugraph.com. Retrieved Aug 13, 2018. 
  18. "Shotgun Histology Dorsal Root Ganglion". YouTube. WashingtonDeceit. Aug 23, 2007. 
  19. Larsen, Stephen (Apr 2, 2010). "Slide 42 - Dorsal Root Sensory Ganglion". YouTube. DrStephenLarsen. 

Myalgic encephalomyelitis or chronic fatigue syndrome, often used when both illnesses are considered the same.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis or M.E. has different diagnostic criteria to chronic fatigue syndrome; neurological symptoms are required but fatigue is an optional symptom.<ref name="ICP2011primer">{{Citation

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.