Emodin

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
Jump to: navigation, search

Emodin is a compound found in rhubarb, buckthorn, Japanese knotweed and many species of fungi.

Emodin is shown to have antiviral activity against cytomegalovirus,[1]herpes simplex,[2]Coxsackie B3,[3] and Coxsackie B4.[4]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Alam, Zohaib; Al-Mahdi, Zainab; Zhu, Yali; McKee, Zachary; Parris, Deborah S.; Parikh, Hardik I.; Kellogg, Glen E.; Kuchta, Alison; McVoy, Michael A. (February 2015), "Anti-cytomegalovirus activity of the anthraquinone atanyl blue PRL", Antiviral Research, 114: 86–95, doi:10.1016/j.antiviral.2014.12.003, ISSN 1872-9096, PMC 4289655Freely accessible, PMID 25499125 
  2. Xiong, Hai-Rong; Luo, Jun; Hou, Wei; Xiao, Hong; Yang, Zhan-Qiu (Jan 27, 2011), "The effect of emodin, an anthraquinone derivative extracted from the roots of Rheum tanguticum, against herpes simplex virus in vitro and in vivo", Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 133 (2): 718–723, doi:10.1016/j.jep.2010.10.059, ISSN 1872-7573, PMID 21050882 
  3. http://en.cnki.com.cn/Article_en/CJFDTOTAL-ZGYA200903006.htm
  4. Liu, Zhao; Wei, Fei; Chen, Liang-Jun; Xiong, Hai-Rong; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Luo, Fan; Hou, Wei; Xiao, Hong; Yang, Zhan-Qiu (Oct 1, 2013), "In Vitro and in Vivo Studies of the Inhibitory Effects of Emodin Isolated from Polygonum cuspidatum on Coxsakievirus B-4", ResearchGate, 18 (10): 11842–58, doi:10.3390/molecules181011842, ISSN 1420-3049, PMID 24071990, retrieved Nov 9, 2016 

cytomegalovirus (CMV) - A common herpesvirus found in humans. Like other herpesviruses, it is a life-long infection that remains in a latent state inside the human body, until it is 'reactivated' by appropriate conditions. CMV infects between 60% to 70% of adults in industrialized countries and close to 100% in emerging countries. Much is unknown about this virus, although it has been found in salivary glands and myeloid blood cells such as monocytes. It has also been linked to the development of certain cancers. Congenital CMV is a leading infectious cause of deafness, learning disabilities, and intellectual disability. A common treatment for CMV is valganciclovir, commonly known as Valcyte.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.