Basant Puri

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Basant K. Puri, Professor, is a member of the Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medicine, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College School of Medicine, UK.[1] He is, also, a part-time consultant and medical researcher at Breakspear Medical, Hertfordshire, UK.[2]

Puri heads the Lipid Neuroscience Group at Imperial College, London, and authored of over 130 peer-reviewed medical and scientific papers and over 30 books.[3]

He used proton neurospectroscopy to identify a differential variation in choline levels in the brains of ME patients, suggesting that there are insufficient levels of fatty acids chains in the brains of ME patients.[4]

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Studies related to ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

  • 2006, Proton and 31-phosphorus neurospectroscopy in the study of membrane phospholipids and fatty acid intervention in schizophrenia, depression, chronic fatigue syndrome (myalgic encephalomyelitis) and dyslexia.[6] - (Abstract)
  • 2007, Review - Current research priorities in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis: disease mechanisms, a diagnostic test and specific treatments[7] - (Full text)
  • 2007, Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and the pathophysiology of myalgic encephalomyelitis (chronic fatigue syndrome)[8] - (Full text)
  • 2009, An in vivo proton neurospectroscopy study of cerebral oxidative stress in myalgic encephalomyelitis (chronic fatigue syndrome)[9] - (Abstract)
  • 2011, Increased tenderness in the left third intercostal space in adult patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis: a controlled study[10] - (Abstract)
  • 2012, Regional grey and white matter volumetric changes in myalgic encephalomyelitis (chronic fatigue syndrome): a voxel-based morphometry 3 T MRI study[11] - (Full text)
  • 2017, A Comparison of Neuroimaging Abnormalities in Multiple Sclerosis, Major Depression and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis): is There a Common Cause?[12] - (Full text)
  • 2018, A Molecular Neurobiological Approach to Understanding the Aetiology of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis or Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease) with Treatment Implications[13] - (Full text)
  • 2019, Myalgic encephalomyelitis or chronic fatigue syndrome: how could the illness develop?[14] - (Full text)
  • 2019, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: From Pathophysiological Insights to Novel Therapeutic Opportunities[15] - (Abstract)

Book chapter[edit | edit source]

  • 2009, "Serial structural MRI analysis and proton and 31PMR spectroscopy in the investigation of cerebral fatty acids in major depressive disorder, Huntington's disease, myalgic encephalomyelitis and in forensic schizophrenic patients"[16] Chapter in Omega-3 Fatty Acids, the Brain and Retina[17] - (Abstract)

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "PWP Messages". www.imperial.ac.uk. Retrieved Sep 23, 2019. 
  2. "Our people". Breakspear Medical. Retrieved Sep 23, 2019. 
  3. "Invest in ME Research - 404 - Page Not Found". www.investinme.org. Retrieved Sep 23, 2019. 
  4. "Invest in ME Research - International ME Conferences and Colloquiums Home Page". investinme.org. Retrieved Sep 23, 2019. 
  5. "Invest in ME Research - International ME Conferences and Colloquiums Home Page". investinme.org. Retrieved Sep 23, 2019. 
  6. Puri, BK (2006), "Proton and 31-phosphorus neurospectroscopy in the study of membrane phospholipids and fatty acid intervention in schizophrenia, depression, chronic fatigue syndrome (myalgic encephalomyelitis) and dyslexia.", International Review of Psychiatry, 18 (2): 145-7, doi:10.1080/09540260600581852, PMID 16777668 
  7. Kerr, J R; Christian, P; Hodgetts, A; Langford, P R; Devanur, L D; Petty, R; Burke, B; Sinclair, L I; Richards, S C M (Jun 2, 2006). "Current research priorities in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis: disease mechanisms, a diagnostic test and specific treatments". Journal of Clinical Pathology. 60 (2): 113–116. doi:10.1136/jcp.2006.042374. ISSN 0021-9746. PMC 1860619Freely accessible. PMID 16935968. 
  8. Puri, B K (Jun 2, 2006). "Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and the pathophysiology of myalgic encephalomyelitis (chronic fatigue syndrome)". Journal of Clinical Pathology. 60 (2): 122–124. doi:10.1136/jcp.2006.042424. ISSN 0021-9746. PMC 1860620Freely accessible. PMID 16935966. 
  9. Puri, B.K.; Agour, M.; Gunatilake, K.D.R.; Fernando, K.A.C.; Gurusinghe, A.I.; Treasaden, I.H. (Nov 2009). "An in vivo proton neurospectroscopy study of cerebral oxidative stress in myalgic encephalomyelitis (chronic fatigue syndrome)". Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids. 81 (5-6): 303–305. doi:10.1016/j.plefa.2009.10.002. 
  10. Puri BK, Gunatilake KD, Fernando KA, Gurusinghe AI, Agour M, Treasaden IH. Increased tenderness in the left third intercostal space in adult patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis: a controlled study. The Journal of International Medical Research,39 (1):212-4.
  11. Puri, BK; Jakeman, PM; Agour, M; Gunatilake, KDR; Fernando, KAC; Gurusinghe, AI; Treasaden, IH; Waldman, AD; Gishen, P (2012), "Regional grey and white matter volumetric changes in myalgic encephalomyelitis (chronic fatigue syndrome): a voxel-based morphometry 3 T MRI study", British Journal of Radiology, 85 (1015): e270-3, doi:10.1259/bjr/93889091 
  12. Morris, Gerwyn; Berk, Michael; Puri, Basant K. (2017), "A Comparison of Neuroimaging Abnormalities in Multiple Sclerosis, Major Depression and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis): is There a Common Cause?", Mol Neurobiology, doi:10.1007/s12035-017-0598-z, PMID 28516431 
  13. Monro, Jean A.; Puri, Basant K. (Sep 2018). "A Molecular Neurobiological Approach to Understanding the Aetiology of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis or Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease) with Treatment Implications". Molecular Neurobiology. 55 (9): 7377–7388. doi:10.1007/s12035-018-0928-9. ISSN 0893-7648. PMC 6096969Freely accessible. PMID 29411266. 
  14. Morris, Gerwyn; Maes, Michael; Berk, Michael; Puri, Basant K. (Feb 13, 2019). "Myalgic encephalomyelitis or chronic fatigue syndrome: how could the illness develop?". Metabolic Brain Disease. doi:10.1007/s11011-019-0388-6. ISSN 0885-7490. PMID 30758706. 
  15. Morris, Gerwyn; Puri, Basant K.; Walker, Adam J.; Maes, Michael; Carvalho, Andre F.; Walder, Ken; Mazza, Catherine; Berk, Michael (Sep 2019). "Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: From pathophysiological insights to novel therapeutic opportunities". Pharmacological Research: 104450. doi:10.1016/j.phrs.2019.104450. 
  16. Puri, Basant K.; Tsaluchidu, Sofia; Treasaden, Ian H. (2008). Simopoulos, A.P.; Bazan, N.G., eds. "Serial Structural MRI Analysis and Proton and 31PMR Spectroscopy in the Investigation of Cerebral Fatty Acids in Major Depressive Disorder, Huntington’s Disease, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and in Forensic Schizophrenic Patients". 99. Basel: KARGER: 31–45. doi:10.1159/000192993. ISBN 9783805590198. 
  17. Simopoulos AP, Bazan NG (eds) (eds): Omega-3 Fatty Acids, the Brain and Retina. World Rev Nutr Diet. Basel, Karger, 2009

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

Systemic exertion intolerance disease (SEID) - A term for ME/CFS that aims to avoid the stigma associated with the term "chronic fatigue syndrome", while emphasizing the defining characteristic of post-exertional malaise (PEM). SEID was defined as part of the diagnostic criteria put together by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report of 10 February 2015.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.