Alain Moreau

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Source:CHU Sainte-Justine

Alain Moreau, PhD, is a Professor in both the Department of Stomatology, Faculty of Dentistry and Dept of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, at Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada and the Director of Network for Canadian Oral Health Research. He was the Scientific Director, Viscogliosi Laboratory in Molecular Genetics of Musculoskeletal Diseases, Sainte-Justine University Research Center, Montréal, Québec, Canada from 2013-2016. He formerly served as the Vice-chair of the Advisory Committee of the Institute of Musculoskeletal Health and Arthritis (IMHA) at the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).[1][2]

Dr. Moreau's chief interests of study are pediatric scoliosis, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.

Dr. Moreau is a member of the Working Group which offers their expertise and resources to the ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center at Stanford University.[3]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

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  1. https://www.omf.ngo/2017/06/09/community-symposium-scientist-list/
  2. https://www.chusj.org/en/Bio?id=0cc915e6-0f9f-4b4b-bdf4-ac7087c2317c
  3. "OMF grants $1.2M to Ramp Up Collaborative Research Center at Stanford University". bos.etapestry.com. Retrieved Sep 12, 2019. 
  4. Alain Moreau, Anita Franco, Sadaallah Bouhanik, Mansour Riazi, Lynda Chadler. (Oct 2016) Plasma homocysteine levels and circulating microRNA profiles in patients with ME/CFS. IACFSME convention poster.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.