Prevalence of myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome

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The prevalence of myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome is estimated at 17-24 million worldwide.[1] In 2015, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report from the United States National Academy of Sciences estimated there were between 836,000 and 2.5 million ME/CFS patients in the U.S.[2] A 2018 study based on insurance claims gave "a rough estimate for the number of patients who may be diagnosed with ME or CFS in the U.S." as between 1.7 million and 3.38 million.[3] Via a machine learning model, the same study predicted the prevalence of ME in the U.S. as roughly 2.8 million (857 out of every 100,000 people).[3]

The IOM Report estimated that between 84% and 91% of patients are not diagnosed.[4][5]

Prevalence of ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

Country Prevalence Population % Comments
Worldwide 17,000,000
Australia 100,000
Canada 561,000 1.9%
Germany 300,000 0.37%
Japan 300,000
New Zealand 20,000 0.45%
Nigeria 0.68%
United Kingdom 250,000 0.4%
United States 1,000,000 0.3%

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2011, CFS Prevalence and Risk Factors Over Time[6](Full Text)
  • 2015, Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - Redefining an Illness[7] (Full Text)
  • 2018, Prevalence and incidence of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome in Europe-the Euro-epiME study from the European network EUROMENE: a protocol for a systematic review.[8] (Full text)
  • 2018, Estimating Prevalence, Demographics, and Costs of ME/CFS Using Large Scale Medical Claims Data and Machine Learning[3] (Full text)

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "How Many People Have ME/CFS? – American ME and CFS Society". Retrieved Jan 31, 2019. 
  2. "Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - Redefining and Illness - Report Brief" (PDF). nataionalacademies.org. 2015. 
  3. 3.03.13.2 Valdez, Ashley R.; Hancock, Elizabeth E.; Adebayo, Seyi; Kiernicki, David J.; Proskauer, Daniel; Attewell, John R.; Bateman, Lucinda; DeMaria, Alfred; Lapp, Charles W.; Rowe, Peter C.; Proskauer, Charmian (Jan 8, 2019). "Estimating Prevalence, Demographics, and Costs of ME/CFS Using Large Scale Medical Claims Data and Machine Learning". Frontiers in Pediatrics. 6. doi:10.3389/fped.2018.00412. ISSN 2296-2360. 
  4. "What is ME/CFS? | Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) | CDC". www.cdc.gov. Jan 18, 2019. Retrieved Jan 31, 2019. 
  5. "Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) Key Facts" (PDF). nationalacademies.org. National Academies of Medicine. 2015. 
  6. Jason, L. A., Porter, N., Hunnell, J., Rademaker, A., & Richman, J. A. (2011). CFS Prevalence and Risk Factors Over Time. Journal of Health Psychology, 16(3), 445–456. http://doi.org/10.1177/1359105310383603
  7. "Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - Redefining an Illness" (PDF). nationacademies.org. 2015. 
  8. Murovska, Modra; Lacerda, Eliana; Sekulic, Slobodan; Capelli, Enrica; Lorusso, Lorenzo; Shikova, Evelina; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Alegre, Jose; Pheby, Derek (Sep 1, 2018). "Prevalence and incidence of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome in Europe—the Euro-epiME study from the European network EUROMENE: a protocol for a systematic review". BMJ Open. 8 (9): e020817. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020817. ISSN 2044-6055. PMID 30181183. 

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

Institute of Medicine report (IOM report) - A report that was commissioned by the U.S. government and was published by the Institute of Medicine on February 10, 2015. The report was titled "Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Redefining an Illness" and proposed the term Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID). Among its key findings were that "This disease is characterized by profound fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, sleep abnormalities, autonomic manifestations, pain, and other symptoms that are made worse by exertion of any sort." The report further stated "Between 836,000 and 2.5 million Americans suffer from myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome."

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

BMJ - The BMJ (previously the British Medical Journal) is a weekly peer-reviewed medical journal.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.