Histamine

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Histamine is a compound involved in local immune responses, regulates the gut, and acts as a neurotransmitter.

Type of histamine receptors[edit]

Role of histamine in the body[edit]

Histamine causes the release of nitric oxide, which in turn causes vasodilation. [1]

Modulating histamine levels[edit]

Histamine is broken down by an enzyme called diamine oxidase (DAO), which is found mainly in the gastrointestinal tract and in pregnant women, the placenta. Nutritional deficiencies in magnesium, Vitamin B6 and copper can decrease DAO activity.

Vitamin C reduces blood histamine levels.[2][3]

Manganese and zinc can prevent the release of histamine from mast cells.

Histamine intolerance[edit]

Histamine intolerance can be a sign of mast cell activation disorder.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Reference needed
  2. http://jn.nutrition.org/content/110/4/662.full.pdf
  3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1578094


The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history