Zoe's Win

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Zoe's Win
Zoe's Win.png
Author Jane Colby
Illustrator Jill Milne
Cover artist Jill Milne
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Subject Illness
Genre Children's fiction
Publisher Dome Vision (UK)
Publication date
1999
Media type print
Pages 80
ISBN 978-0953733002

Zoe's Win is a 1999 children's book especially for children with ME, written by Jane Colby and illustrated by Jill Milne.[1]

Publisher's synopsis[edit | edit source]

(This synopsis was provided by the publisher for promotional purposes. For book reviews, please see Links section below.)


Zoe's Win by Jane Colby is a remarkable book - the first of its kind. Telling the story of a child with ME in a way that ensures no-one will remain unmoved, it includes a self-help section and, best of all, unequivocal advice for doctors and teachers:

ME is an organic illness, court cases result from inappropriate treatment, and education must by law be tailored for the children's needs. The National Curriculum is unsuitable for children with ME and many fare better out of school than in it.

Reviews by Mark and Anna Daffin (aged 15 and 13, TYMES Issue 30) give it 10 out of 10, and Dr Nigel Hunt of the CMO's Working Group recommends it as "a truly welcome addition to the ME literature". Includes the full statistics from the BBC's "Panorama" on ME in children.[2]

Links[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Zoe's Win, Jane Colby - Dome Vision - 1999, ISBN-10: 0953733009, ISBN-13: 978-0953733002
  2. "Jo's review of Zoe's Win". www.goodreads.com. Retrieved Sep 22, 2019. 

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.