Tom Wileman

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Source: www.investinme.org

Tom Wileman, Phd., is a Professor of Infection & Immunity and the Director of the Biomedical Research Centre (BMRC) at the University of East Anglia, Norfolk, UK. Key research interests include autophagy (the natural process that eliminates unnecessary or dysfunctional cellular components), its possible role in Crohn's disease, and what effect it has on the delivery of gene therapy vectors to replace genes associated with specific illnesses.[1]

2017 Ramsay Award[edit | edit source]

A team comprised of Dr. Tom Wileman of the University of East Anglia and Dr. Simon Carding and Fiona Newberry (PhD candidate) of the Quadram Institute of Bioscience were awarded a 2017 Ramsay Award grant from the Solve ME/CFS Initiative for researching alterations in the intestinal virome in ME/CFS.[2]

Research with ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

  • In 2016, he coauthored a literature review on: "the current evidence supporting an infectious aetiology for ME/CFS leading us to propose the novel concept that the intestinal microbiota and in particular members of the virome are a source of the “infectious” trigger of the disease. Such an approach has the potential to identify disease biomarkers and influence therapeutics, providing much-needed approaches in preventing and managing a disease desperately in need of confronting."[3]

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

virome The human virome is the collection of all viruses that are found in or on humans.

microbiome The full collection of microscopic organisms (especially bacteria and fungi) which are present in a particular environment, particularly inside the human body.

virome The human virome is the collection of all viruses that are found in or on humans.

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.