Single nucleotide polymorphism

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A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is a potential genetic mutation that occurs in a single spot in the human genome.[1] A single spot in the human genome is represented physically by a particular nucleotide base-pair in the DNA, such as cytosine-guanine or adenine-thymine. For example, 60% of the general population may have a cytosine-guanine base pair at a particular location in their DNA, but 40% of the population may have a adenine-thymine base pair at that location instead. SNP's are often represented by an "rs" number, such as "rs53576".[2]

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References[edit | edit source]

  1. Genetics Home Reference. "What are single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)?". Genetics Home Reference. Retrieved Oct 3, 2019. 
  2. "rs53576 - SNPedia". www.snpedia.com. Retrieved Oct 6, 2019. 

A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, pronounced "snip") is a potential genetic mutation that occurs in a single spot in the human genome; a difference in a single DNA building block.[1][2] SNPs are often represented by an "rs" number, such as "rs53576".[3]

A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, pronounced "snip") is a potential genetic mutation that occurs in a single spot in the human genome; a difference in a single DNA building block.[4][5] SNPs are often represented by an "rs" number, such as "rs53576".[6]

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.