Post-polio syndrome

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Post-polio syndrome (PPS, or post-poliomyelitis syndrome or post-polio sequelae) is a condition that affects polio survivors years after their recovery from an initial acute attack of the poliovirus.[1] It is characterized by new and progressive muscular weakness, pain, and fatigue that becomes apparent many years after the occurrence of acute paralytic or non-paralytic polio.[2]

Signs and symptoms[edit | edit source]

These include the following:[2][3]

  • Fatigue (both general and muscular)
  • Muscle weakness
  • Muscle pain
  • Gait disturbance
  • Respiratory problems
  • Swallowing problems (dysphagia)
  • Autonomic dysfunction
  • Sleep apnea
  • Flat-back syndrome

Incidence and prevalence[edit | edit source]

The exact incidence and prevalence of postpolio syndrome (PPS) is unknown and statistics vary. Medscape reports the incidence in previous acute polio patients ranges from approximately 22-68%.[2] The NIH estimates that the condition affects 25 to 40 percent of polio survivors.[1] In 1992, a study of former poliomyelitis patients from Allegheny County, Pennsylvania estimates 28.5% of all paralytic polio cases develop PPS.[4] Suggestions have been made that 100% of polio survivors, if tracked for a long period, can develop some symptoms of PPS.[2]

ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

  • In 1998 polio expert Richard Bruno, along with colleagues, reviewed the clinical findings in PPS and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). They found significant parallels which suggested a possible common pathophysiology.[5]
  • In 2014 a Swedish clinician, using Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), compared the quality of life in 124 patients with PPS and 100 patients with ME/CFS. Results indicated that both groups have lower quality of life than Swedish controls, and that ME/CFS patients had a lower quality of life compared with PPS patients.[6]
  • A study in 2019, using the self-reporting questionnaires, DePaul Symptom Questionnaire 2 (DSQ-2) and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), found that participants with ME/CFS were more functionally impaired across symptoms than those with PPS.[7] Additionally, the study found that the three domains that most commonly differentiated ME/CFS from PPS were neurocognitive, post-exertional malaise, and neuroendocrine.[7]

Research studies[edit | edit source]

  • 1998, Parallels between post-polio fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: a common pathophysiology?[5] - (Abstract)
  • 2014, Comparison of quality of life in patients with post-polio syndrome and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome with Swedish norm[6] - (Abstract)
  • 2019, Differentiating post-polio syndrome from myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome[7] - (Abstract)

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.1 "Post-Polio Syndrome Fact Sheet | National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke". www.ninds.nih.gov. Retrieved Jan 16, 2020. 
  2. 2.02.12.22.3 "Postpolio Syndrome: Practice Essentials, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology". Nov 14, 2019. 
  3. "Post-Polio Syndrome Information Page | National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke". www.ninds.nih.gov. Retrieved Jan 16, 2020. 
  4. Ramlow, J.; Alexander, M.; LaPorte, R.; Kaufmann, C.; Kuller, L. (Oct 1, 1992). "Epidemiology of the Post-Polio Syndrome". American Journal of Epidemiology. 136 (7): 769–786. doi:10.1093/aje/136.7.769. ISSN 0002-9262. 
  5. 5.05.1 Bruno, Richard L; Creange, Susan J; Frick, Nancy M (Sep 28, 1998). "Parallels between post-polio fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: a common pathophysiology?". The American Journal of Medicine. 105 (3, Supplement 1): 66S–73S. doi:10.1016/S0002-9343(98)00161-2. ISSN 0002-9343. 
  6. 6.06.1 Östlund, G. (May 2014). "Comparison of quality of life in patients with post-polio syndrome and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome with Swedish norm". Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine. 57: e99. doi:10.1016/j.rehab.2014.03.340. 
  7. 7.07.17.2 Klebek, Lauren; Sunnquist, Madison; Jason, Leonard A. (Oct 2, 2019). "Differentiating post-polio syndrome from myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome". Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior. 7 (4): 196–206. doi:10.1080/21641846.2019.1687117. ISSN 2164-1846. 

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

Short Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) - A 36-item patient-reported questionnaire, used to determine patient health status and quality of life.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.