PACE Trial Steering Committee

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The PACE Trial Steering Committee (or TSC) was "responsible for the independent oversight of the progress of the trial, investigation of serious adverse events, and determining the future progress of the trial in the light of regular reports from the DMEC" (Data Monitoring and Ethics Committee).[1] The Medical Research Council approved the members of the PACE Trial Steering Committee.[1]

The PACE Trial Steering Committee members were:

Name Role Organization Expertise
Prof Janet Darbyshire Chair of TSC
Prof Jenny Butler occupational therapist
Prof Patrick Doherty physiotherapist
Dr Stella Harris patient representative
Dr Meirion Llewelyn consultant doctor in infectious diseases
Professor Tom Sensky liaison psychiatrist and CBT therapist


PACE TSC observers[edit | edit source]

Name Role Organization Expertise
Professor Mansel Aylward observer previously of the Dept. for Work and Pensions
Mr Chris Clark observer Action for ME
Peter Craig observer Scottish Executive
Dr. Moira Henderson observer Dept. for Work and Pensions
Susan Lonsdale observer Department of Health
Dr Sarah Perkins Medical Research Council
Professor Stephen Stansfeld observer Queen Mary University of London (a trial sponsor)
Dr Alison Wearden observer Principal Investigator of the FINE trial, a "sister study to PACE") Psychologist

PACE Trial Principlal Investigators[edit | edit source]

Name Role Organization Expertise
Prof Peter White Co-principal investigator Queen Mary University of London
Trudie Chalder Co-principal investigator Psychologist
Michael Sharpe Co-principal investigator Oxford University
Rebecca Walwyn Trial statistician
Tony Johnson Trial statistician
Julia DeCesare Trial manager (secretary to the committee)

Previous members/observers[edit | edit source]

Members/observers prior to March 2007.

Name Role Organization Expertise
Dr Robin Buckle Medical Research Council
Prof Clair Chilvers Department of Health R & D

Data Monitoring and Ethics Committee[edit | edit source]

The Data Monitoring and Ethics Committee (DMEC) was "independent and responsible for monitoring progress of the trial and serious adverse events and reactions". The DMEC was expected to meet at least once per year, and was to produce a "trial progress report" for each meeting.[1]

DMEC members were:

PACE Trial Management Group[edit | edit source]

The separate PACE Trial Management Group (TMG) was "responsible for the day-to-day running and management of the trial".

First wave therapists[edit | edit source]

Therapists involved in piloting the therapies

Vincent Deary CBT

Nicola Dyer GET

Sally Ludlum APT

Louise Mason APT

Bella Stensnas CBT

Claire Topfer GET

Tracey Turner GET

Sally Wagner APT

Sue Wilkins CBT

Giselle Withers CBT

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

PACE trial - A controversial study which claimed that CBT and GET were effective in treating "CFS/ME", despite the fact that its own data did not support this conclusion. Its results and methodology were widely disputed by patients, scientists, and the peer-reviewed scientific literature.

cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) - A type of psychotherapy geared toward modifying alleged unhealthy thinking, behaviors or illness beliefs. One of the treatment arms used in the controversial PACE trial.

PACE trial - A controversial study which claimed that CBT and GET were effective in treating "CFS/ME", despite the fact that its own data did not support this conclusion. Its results and methodology were widely disputed by patients, scientists, and the peer-reviewed scientific literature.

Oxford University - a prestigious university located in Oxford, England renowned for its teaching and research in health and medicine

graded exercise therapy (GET) - A gradual increase in exercise or activity, according to a pre-defined plan. Focuses on overcoming the patient's alleged unhelpful illness beliefs that exertion can exacerbate symptoms, rather than on reversing physical deconditioning. Considered controversial, and possibly harmful, in the treatment or management of ME. One of the treatment arms of the controversial PACE trial.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.