Looking back with ME: Living for a quarter of a century with the neuroimmune disorder ME

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Looking back with ME: Living for a quarter of a century with the neuroimmune disorder ME
Looking back with ME.jpg
Author Hazel Stapleton
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Subject ME
Genre Non-fiction, memoirs
Publisher Life Stories
Publication date
June 2017
Media type print
Pages 64
ISBN 1846255821, 9781846255823

Background[edit | edit source]

Looking back with ME: Living for a quarter of a century with the neuroimmune disorder ME is a memoir about living with myalgic encephalomyelitis by Hazel Stapleton.

Synopsis[edit | edit source]

From the Amazon website -

At the age of eighteen, Hazel Stapleton suddenly went from being a healthy, active teenager who had just embarked on a career in nursing, to being chronically ill, with numerous serious health complications developing over the subsequent years, leaving her house-bound and now mainly bed-bound. Since her diagnosis with the neuroimmune disorder ME (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis),

Hazel has realized that many people are unaware of the impact and serious nature of this illness, which is often portrayed as a psychological problem.

In this book, through telling of her own experiences of ME, she seeks to raise awareness about this devastating condition and the effects it has on people’s lives.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Hazel Stapleton is originally from North Somerset. She was diagnosed with ME in 1991.

Since then her health has deteriorated, and she is now house-bound and most of the

time bed-bound. Hazel lives with her parents in County Down, Northern Ireland.

https://smile.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07PH4KTGT/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_Lh4VFb2ZBXTMD

Reception[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

myalgic encephalomyelitis (M.E.) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.