Jonathan Lyons

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Source:NIH

Jonathan J. Lyons, MD, works in the Genetics and Pathogenesis of Allergy Section of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health in the United States.[1]

Dr Lyons is one of the Associate Investigators assigned to the NIH Post-Infectious ME/CFS Study.[2]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2016, Elevated basal serum tryptase identifies a multisystem disorder associated with increased TPSAB1 copy number[3]

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

  • PubMed
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Website
  • YouTube

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. https://www.niaid.nih.gov/research/jonathan-lyons-md
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/cdcgrandrounds/pdf/archives/2016/feb2016.pdf page 54
  3. Jonathan J Lyons, Xiaomin Yu, Jason D Hughes, Quang T Le, Ali Jamil, Yun Bai, Nancy Ho, Ming Zhao, Yihui Liu, Michael P O'Connell, Neil N Trivedi, Celeste Nelson, Thomas DiMaggio, Nina Jones, Helen Matthews, Katie L Lewis, Andrew J Oler, Ryan J Carlson, Peter D Arkwright, Celine Hong, Sherene Agama, Todd M Wilson, Sofie Tucker, Yu Zhang, Joshua J McElwee, M Pao, SC Glover, ME Rothenberg, RJ Hohman, KD Stone, GH Caughey, T Heller, DD Metcalfe, LG Biesecker, LB Schwartz, Joshua D Milner. (2016). Elevated basal serum tryptase identifies a multisystem disorder associated with increased TPSAB1 copy number. Nature Genetics. 48(12):1564-1569. doi: 10.1038/ng.3696.

National Institutes of Health (NIH) - A set of biomedical research institutes operated by the U.S. government, under the auspices of the Department of Health and Human Services.

serum The clear yellowish fluid that remains from blood plasma after clotting factors have been removed by clot formation. (Blood plasma is simply blood that has had its blood cells removed.)

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.