Geraldine Cambridge

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Doctor Geraldine Cambridge, also known as Jo Cambridge, is Principal Research Fellow, Inflammation, Division of Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University College London in the United Kingdom. She has previously worked with Jonathan Edwards in rheumatoid arthritis Rituximab research.

She spoke at the Invest in ME International ME Conferences in 2015 and 2016 about immunoregulation in patients with ME and the IiME Rituximab study.[1][2]

Dr. Cambridge was the Principal Investigator of the Invest in ME UK RITUXIMAB Clinical Trial and B-Cell Research, along with a team from Rayne Institute, University College London.

Awards[edit | edit source]

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

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References[edit | edit source]

  1. "Invest in ME Research - IIMEC11 International ME Conference 2016". Invest in ME Research. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  2. "Invest in ME Research - IIMEC10 International ME Conference 2015". Invest in ME Research. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  3. "2016 Ramsay Award Program Results". Solve ME/CFS Initiative. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  4. "Metabolic Analysis of B-Cell Maturation in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Solve ME/CFS Initiative. December 7, 2016. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  5. "Invest in ME Research - IIMEC10 International ME Conference 2015". Invest in ME Research. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  6. "Invest in ME Research - IIMEC11 International ME Conference 2016". Invest in ME Research. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  7. "Invest in ME Research - IIMEC12 International ME Conference 2017". Invest in ME Research. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  8. CARE4ME Conference | Part Six (Prof. Dr. Jo Cambridge), retrieved February 18, 2020
  9. "Abstract Presentation: Differences Between Immunophenotype of B Cells from Healthy Controls & Patients with ME/CFS". Emerge Australia - ME/CFS International Research Symposium. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  10. Mensah, Fane; Bansal, Amolak; Berkovitz, Saul; Sharma, Arti; Reddy, Venkat; Leandro, Maria; Cambridge, Geraldine (2016), "Extended B cell phenotype in patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A cross-sectional study", Clinical and Experimental Immunology, 184 (2): 237-247, doi:10.1111/cei.12749
  11. Mensah, Fane; Bansal, Amolak; Ford, Brian; Cambridge, Geraldine (2017), "Chronic fatigue syndrome and the immune system: Where are we now?", Neurophysiologie Clinique, 47 (2): 131-138, doi:10.1016/j.neucli.2017.02.002
  12. Mensah, Fane F. K.; Armstrong, Christopher W.; Reddy, Venkat; Bansal, Amolak S.; Berkovitz, Saul; Leandro, Maria J.; Cambridge, Geraldine (2018). "CD24 Expression and B Cell Maturation Shows a Novel Link With Energy Metabolism: Potential Implications for Patients With Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Frontiers in Immunology. 9. doi:10.3389/fimmu.2018.02421. ISSN 1664-3224.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.