Flea

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
Jump to: navigation, search

Michael Balzary, commonly known by his stage name Flea, was born in 1962 in Melbourne, Australia. He moved to New York with his parents when he was five. Balzary is better known as the bassist from the band Red Hot Chili Peppers. Apart from his career as musician and songwriter, Balzary is also a professional actor.[1]

Illness[edit | edit source]

In "1993, Flea was diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome and was ordered to rest for a year."[1]

"Flea is suffering from “chronic fatigue syndrome” as the result of heavy touring, although the band have now been off the road for roughly five months."[2]

"The Warners spokesperson commented: “The doctor has said that he (Flea) can’t go on the road. The disease causes extreme tiredness. Some mornings you can’t pick up a cup, let alone a guitar.”"[2]

The Chilli ME Challenge[edit | edit source]

The Chilli ME Challenge, an innovative fundraising project for ME research, was started by fans of the band who likewise had ME in honor of Flea with the hopes of bringing awareness and funds to the illness.[3]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.