Compression stocking

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Compression stockings are tight clothing designed for medical use that covers the lower legs fully.

Theory[edit | edit source]

Wearing compression stockings on the lower legs may improve orthostatic intolerance,[1] which is a group of conditions that are very common in ME/CFS patients, and are recognized as a potential symptom in diagnosis according to the most recent CDC criteria.[2]

Orthostatic intolerance (OI) causes ME/CFS symptoms to worsen when the patient stands or sits. is It affected by blood circulation, which may reduce the severity of some cardiac or circulatory symptoms in ME/CFS patients.[1]

Evidence[edit | edit source]

A small study by van Campen et al. (2022) found that CEP Run 2.0 knee-high lower leg compression stockings, with a closed toe, improved both average cardiac output and blood flow to the brain during a tilt table test in ME/CFS patients. Both cardiac output and cerebral blood flow (CBF) reduce when patients sit or stand, and the compression stockings reduced this effect but made no difference when patients were putting down.[1]

According to the authors of the study, CEP Run 2.0 compression stockings provide 20–25mm Hg of compression.[1]

Clinicians[edit | edit source]

Risks and safety[edit | edit source]

Costs and availability[edit | edit source]

Compression stockings are widely available although it is often unclear which stockings have been assessed as appropriate for medical use, and what pressure they provide.[1]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2022, Compression Stockings Improve Cardiac Output and Cerebral Blood Flow during Tilt Testing in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) Patients: A Randomized Crossover Trial[1] - (Full text)
  • 2018, Quantification of the beneficial effects of compression stockings on symptoms of exercise and orthostatic intolerance in chronic fatigue/myalgic encephalomyelitis patients[3] - (Full text)

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a U.S. government agency dedicated to epidemiology and public health. It operates under the auspices of the Department of Health and Human Services.

orthostatic intolerance (OI) - The development of symptoms when standing upright, where symptoms are relieved upon reclining. Patients with orthostatic intolerance have trouble remaining upright for more than a few seconds or a few minutes, depending upon severity. In severe orthostatic intolerance, patients may not be able to sit upright in bed. Orthostatic intolerance is often a sign of dysautonomia. There are different types of orthostatic intolerance, including postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS).

orthostatic intolerance (OI) - The development of symptoms when standing upright, where symptoms are relieved upon reclining. Patients with orthostatic intolerance have trouble remaining upright for more than a few seconds or a few minutes, depending upon severity. In severe orthostatic intolerance, patients may not be able to sit upright in bed. Orthostatic intolerance is often a sign of dysautonomia. There are different types of orthostatic intolerance, including postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS).

cerebral blood flow (CBF) - the amount of blood that goes through the arterial tree in the brain in a given amount of time

cerebral blood flow (CBF) - the amount of blood that goes through the arterial tree in the brain in a given amount of time

myalgic encephalomyelitis (M.E.) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) - A form of orthostatic intolerance where the cardinal symptom is excessive tachycardia due to changing position (e.g. from lying down to sitting up).

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.