Chronic illness

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I am constantly in a 'Catch-22' between always overextending myself to please others and facing people's disbelief and judgment when I can't go on or have to ask for help." - A person with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Chronic illness refers to any long-term illness, regardless of the severity.[1] Chronic illnesses are very common, affecting 6 in 10 Americans.[2]

Chronic illnesses may have gradual onset, and can be either progressive, or have a more stable course.[1]

Chronic compared to acute illness[edit | edit source]

Unlike chronic illnesses, acute illnesses are characterized by their sudden onset and short duration.[3]

Treatments and searching for a cure[edit | edit source]

Chronic illnesses, by definition, do not have a quick treatment or cure.[4]

The seductive message of having control over their illness can doom the chronically ill to a constant quest for a cure with the right diet and exercise, the right answers. Hopelessness and more guilt is often the sad conclusion to such a search.
―Sick and Tired of Feeling Sick and Tired: Living with Invisible Chronic Illness, Donoghue and Siegel (2000)
Popular books preach a type of control by strong mind and positive attitude, which motivates some to a better life but crushes others. The chronically ill can berate themselves for not being well. - Donoghue and Siegel (2000)


Invisible illnesses[edit | edit source]

Most chronic illness are invisible illnesses.[5][6]:19

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2020, Energy Impairment and Disability Inclusion: Towards an Advocacy Movement for Energy Limiting Chronic Illness.[7](Full text)

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.1 "Definition of CHRONIC". Merrian-Webster Medical Dictionary. Retrieved November 29, 2021.
  2. "Chronic disease". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  3. "Definition of ACUTE". Merrian-Webster Medical Dictionary. Retrieved November 29, 2021.
  4. Donoghue, Paul J.; Siegel, Mary E. (September 17, 2000). Sick and Tired of Feeling Sick and Tired: Living with Invisible Chronic Illness (New ed.). W. W. Norton & Company. ISBN 978-0-393-34283-3.
  5. Taylor, Renee R. (September 1, 2005). "Can the Social Model Explain All of Disability Experience? Perspectives of Persons With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome" (PDF). The American Journal of Occupational Therapy. 59 (5): 497–506. doi:10.5014/ajot.59.5.497. ISSN 0272-9490.
  6. Arroll, Megan A. (September 18, 2014). Invisible Illness: Coping with misunderstood conditions. SPCK. ISBN 978-1-84709-306-6.
  7. Hale, Catherine; Benstead, Stef; Lyus, Jenny; Odell, Evan; Ruddock, Anna (2020). Energy Impairment and Disability Inclusion: Towards an Advocacy Movement for Energy Limiting Chronic Illness (PDF). Centre for Welfare Reform. ISBN 978-1-912712-25-0.

chronic illness any long-term illness, regardless of the severity. Chronic illnesses are typically incurable, requiring long-term management.

chronic illness any long-term illness, regardless of the severity. Chronic illnesses are typically incurable, requiring long-term management.

chronic illness any long-term illness, regardless of the severity. Chronic illnesses are typically incurable, requiring long-term management.

chronic illness any long-term illness, regardless of the severity. Chronic illnesses are typically incurable, requiring long-term management.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a U.S. government agency dedicated to epidemiology and public health. It operates under the auspices of the Department of Health and Human Services.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.