Cell membrane

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
Jump to: navigation, search

The cell membrane separates the interior of cells from the housed environment. In humans and all eukaryotes, cell membranes are composed of a phospholipid bilayer. This allows membranes to be selectively permeable to ions and organic molecules and control their movement in and out of cells.

Cell membranes are involved in cell adhesion, ion conductivity and cell signaling.

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

Cell membrane - A very thin membrane, composed of lipids and protein, that surrounds the cytoplasm of a cell and controls the passage of substances into and out of the cell.

Cell membrane - A very thin membrane, composed of lipids and protein, that surrounds the cytoplasm of a cell and controls the passage of substances into and out of the cell.

Cell membrane - A very thin membrane, composed of lipids and protein, that surrounds the cytoplasm of a cell and controls the passage of substances into and out of the cell.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.