Lysosomal associated membrane protein 1

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Lysosomal Associated Membrane Protein 1 or LAMP1 or LAMP-1 or CD107a.[1]

Function[edit | edit source]

Lysosomal associated membrane glycoproteins (LAMPs) found in humans include:

  • LAMP1 (CD107a), which is most abundant in NK cells
  • LAMP2 (CD107b)
  • LAMP3 (CD63)[2]

ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2017, Intermittent and graded exercise effects on NK cell degranulation markers LAMP‐1/LAMP‐2 and CD8+ CD38+ in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis[2] - (Full text)

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

membrane The word "membrane" can have different meanings in different fields of biology. In cell biology, a membrane is a layer of molecules that surround its contents. Examples of cell-biology membranes include the "cell membrane" that surrounds a cell, the "mitochondrial membranes" that form the outer layers of mitochondria, and the "viral envelope" that surrounds enveloped viruses. In anatomy or tissue biology, a membrane is a barrier formed by a layer of cells. Examples of anatomical membranes include the pleural membranes that surrounds the lungs, the pericardium which surrounds the heart, and some of the layers within the blood-brain barrier.

membrane The word "membrane" can have different meanings in different fields of biology. In cell biology, a membrane is a layer of molecules that surround its contents. Examples of cell-biology membranes include the "cell membrane" that surrounds a cell, the "mitochondrial membranes" that form the outer layers of mitochondria, and the "viral envelope" that surrounds enveloped viruses. In anatomy or tissue biology, a membrane is a barrier formed by a layer of cells. Examples of anatomical membranes include the pleural membranes that surrounds the lungs, the pericardium which surrounds the heart, and some of the layers within the blood-brain barrier.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.