Borna disease virus

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The Borna disease virus (BDV) is in the viral order of Mononegavirales. Borna disease is considered to be a zoonotic disease, that is, a disease that spreads from animals to humans. Borna disease virus can be transmitted by many animals including birds, rodents, and horses.[1]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

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References[edit | edit source]

  1. Borna Disease - CDC - Emerging Infectious Diseases
  2. Nakaya, T.; Takahashi, H.; Nakamur, Y.; Kuratsune, H.; Kitani, T.; Machii, T.; Yamanishi, K.; Ikuta, K. (1999). "Borna disease virus infection in two family clusters of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome". Microbiology and Immunology. 43 (7): 679–689. ISSN 0385-5600. PMID 10529109. 
  3. Kitani, T.; Kuratsune, H.; Fuke, I.; Nakamura, Y.; Nakaya, T.; Asahi, S.; Tobiume, M.; Yamaguti, K.; Machii, T. (1996). "Possible correlation between Borna disease virus infection and Japanese patients with chronic fatigue syndrome". Microbiology and Immunology. 40 (6): 459–462. ISSN 0385-5600. PMID 8839433. 
  4. Nakaya, T.; Kuratsune, H.; Kitani, T.; Ikuta, K. (Nov 1997). "[Demonstration on Borna disease virus in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome]". Nihon Rinsho. Japanese Journal of Clinical Medicine. 55 (11): 3064–3071. ISSN 0047-1852. PMID 9396313. 
  5. Susan Levine. (1999). Borna Disease Virus Proteins in Patients with CFS. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 5, Iss. 3-4, pp. 199-206. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v05n03_17
  6. Evengård, B.; Briese, T.; Lindh, G.; Lee, S.; Lipkin, W. I. (Oct 1999). "Absence of evidence of Borna disease virus infection in Swedish patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Journal of Neurovirology. 5 (5): 495–499. ISSN 1355-0284. PMID 10568886. 
  7. Nakaya, T.; Takahashi, H.; Nakamur, Y.; Kuratsune, H.; Kitani, T.; Machii, T.; Yamanishi, K.; Ikuta, K. (1999). "Borna disease virus infection in two family clusters of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome". Microbiology and Immunology. 43 (7): 679–689. ISSN 0385-5600. PMID 10529109. 

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.