Borna disease virus

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The Borna disease virus (BDV) is in the viral order of Mononegavirales. Borna disease is considered to be a zoonotic disease, that is, a disease that spreads from animals to humans. Borna disease virus can be transmitted by many animals including birds, rodents, and horses.[1]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

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References[edit | edit source]

  1. Borna Disease - CDC - Emerging Infectious Diseases
  2. Nakaya, T.; Takahashi, H.; Nakamur, Y.; Kuratsune, H.; Kitani, T.; Machii, T.; Yamanishi, K.; Ikuta, K. (1999). "Borna disease virus infection in two family clusters of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome". Microbiology and Immunology. 43 (7): 679–689. ISSN 0385-5600. PMID 10529109. 
  3. Kitani, T.; Kuratsune, H.; Fuke, I.; Nakamura, Y.; Nakaya, T.; Asahi, S.; Tobiume, M.; Yamaguti, K.; Machii, T. (1996). "Possible correlation between Borna disease virus infection and Japanese patients with chronic fatigue syndrome". Microbiology and Immunology. 40 (6): 459–462. ISSN 0385-5600. PMID 8839433. 
  4. Nakaya, T.; Kuratsune, H.; Kitani, T.; Ikuta, K. (Nov 1997). "[Demonstration on Borna disease virus in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome]". Nihon Rinsho. Japanese Journal of Clinical Medicine. 55 (11): 3064–3071. ISSN 0047-1852. PMID 9396313. 
  5. Susan Levine. (1999). Borna Disease Virus Proteins in Patients with CFS. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 5, Iss. 3-4, pp. 199-206. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v05n03_17
  6. Evengård, B.; Briese, T.; Lindh, G.; Lee, S.; Lipkin, W. I. (Oct 1999). "Absence of evidence of Borna disease virus infection in Swedish patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Journal of Neurovirology. 5 (5): 495–499. ISSN 1355-0284. PMID 10568886. 
  7. Nakaya, T.; Takahashi, H.; Nakamur, Y.; Kuratsune, H.; Kitani, T.; Machii, T.; Yamanishi, K.; Ikuta, K. (1999). "Borna disease virus infection in two family clusters of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome". Microbiology and Immunology. 43 (7): 679–689. ISSN 0385-5600. PMID 10529109. 

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.