Arthur Hartz

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Arthur J. Hartz, MD, PhD, practices Epidemiology and Observation Medicine. He is an Professor Emeritus and former research director for the Department of Family Medicine at the Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. One of his research interests is fatigue.

Awards[edit | edit source]

  • 2002, Quality in Family Medicine Professorship, at the College of Medicine, University of Iowa.[1]

Iowa Fatigue Scale[edit | edit source]

The Iowa Fatigue Scale (IFS) is a eleven question patient survey used to measure fatigue severity in primary care settings. It was developed by in 2003 by Arthur Hartz, Suzanne E. Bentler, and David Watson at the University of Iowa.[2]

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee[edit | edit source]

Dr. Hartz served as a voting member of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee from 04/01/07 to 04/01/11.[3][4]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 1998, Characteristics of Fatigued Persons Associated with Features of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome [5](Abstract)
  • 1999, Prognostic Factors for Persons With Idiopathic Chronic Fatigue[6](Full Text)
  • 2003, Measuring fatigue severity in primary care patients[2]
  • 2005, Prospective observational study of treatments for unexplained chronic fatigue[7](Abstract)

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. http://www.news-releases.uiowa.edu/2002/may/0530medicinecelebration.htm
  2. 2.02.1 Hartz, AJ; Bentler, SE; Watson, D (2003), "Measuring fatigue severity in primary care patients", Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 54 (6): 515-521, doi:10.1016/S0022-3999(02)00600-1 
  3. HHS.gov (2009), May 27 & 28, 2009 CFSAC Meeting (PDF) (Roster) 
  4. HHS.gov (2010), October 12 & 13, 2010 CFSAC Meeting (PDF) (Roster) 
  5. Arthur J. Hartz, Evelyn M. Kuhn & Paul H. Levine. (1998). Characteristics of Fatigued Persons Associated with Features of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 4, Iss. 3, pp. 71-97. DOI:10.1300/J092v04n03_07
  6. Hartz, Arthur J.; Kuhn, Evelyn M.; Bentler, Suzanne E.; Levine, Paul H.; London, Richard (1999), "Prognostic Factors for Persons With Idiopathic Chronic Fatigue", Archives of Family Medicine, 8: 495-501 
  7. Bentler, SE; Hartz, AJ; Kuhn, EM (2005), "Prospective observational study of treatments for unexplained chronic fatigue", J Clin Psychiatry, 66 (5): 625-32, PMID 15889950 

chronic fatigue (CF) - Persistent and abnormal fatigue is a symptom, not an illness. It may be caused by depression, multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome or many other illnesses. The term "chronic fatigue" should never be confused with the disease chronic fatigue syndrome.

somatic symptom disorder - A psychiatric term to describe an alleged condition whereby a person's thoughts somehow cause physical symptoms. The actual existence of such a condition is highly controversial, due to a lack of scientific evidence. It is related to other psychiatric terms, such as "psychosomatic", "neurasthenia", and "hysteria". Older terms include "somatization", "somatoform disorder", and "conversion disorder". Such terms refer to a scientifically-unsupported theory that claims that a wide range of physical symptoms can be created by the human mind, a theory which has been criticized as "mind over matter" parapsychology, a pseudoscience. Although "Somatic Symptom Disorder" is the term used by DSM-5, the term "Bodily Distress Disorder" has been proposed for ICD-11. (Learn more: www.psychologytoday.com)

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.