Ampligen Exercise Tolerance - graph 1

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Source - doi:10.16966/2470-1009.103

Graph from study, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME): Characteristics of Responders to Rintatolimod.[1]

Key to graph[edit | edit source]

  • "Rintatolimod" - chemical name for Ampligen
  • "ET" - exercise tolerance measured by seconds on a treadmill using a modified Bruce exercise test (i.e., a cardiac diagnostic test which starts at a lower workload than the standard test and is typically used for elderly or sedentary patients)[2]
  • "ITT" - intent-to-treat population which is a statistical concept term used in studies to denote that the analysis includes every subject who was randomly placed in a treatment assignment group, and ignores noncompliance, protocol deviations, withdrawal, and anything that happens after randomization. It is considered a more accurate way to analyze data since noncompliance and protocol deviations would occur during clinical use.[3]

Interpretation of graph[edit | edit source]

  • Panel A - total study population retested at 40 weeks
  • Panel B - subset of study population retested at 40 weeks who could complete >9 minutes using a modified Bruce exercise test prior to receiving rintatolimod

See also[edit | edit source]

Ampligen

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Strayer, David R; Stouch, Bruce C; Stevens, Staci R.; Bateman, Lucinda; Lapp, Charles W; Peterson, Daniel L; Carter, William A; Mitchell, William M (August 8, 2015), "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME): Characteristics of Responders to Rintatolimod" (PDF), Journal of Drug Research and Development, 1 (1), doi:10.16966/2470-1009.103
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_protocol
  3. Gupta, SK (2011), "Intention-to-treat concept: A review.", Perspectives in Clinical Research, 2 (3): 109-112, doi:10.4103/2229-3485.83221

myalgic encephalomyelitis (M.E.) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.