Merryn Crofts

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Merryn Crofts was a young woman with very severe myalgic encephalomyelitis and also had suspected Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and mast cell activation disorder in the later years of her illness. She died on 23rd May 2017, 10 days after her 21st birthday. Her symptoms originally began in August 2011 when she was 15, and by the time of her death in May 2017, she had been completely bed-bound for the previous three years, had hypersensitivities to light, noise, touch, smell and movement, had gastrointestinal hypersensitivities which meant she had to be TPN fed by a Broviac line, was in total pain, amongst many more symptoms.

An inquest into her death was held on Friday 18th May 2018 at Rochdale Coroner’s Court. The coroner, and multiple medical experts, overwhelmingly agreed that her death was due to starvation due to having to be removed from her Broviac line which was ultimately caused by ME. A psychiatrist present stated there was categorically no mental health issues with Merryn and that her illness was ME which is clearly very physical. Other medical professionals present also stated that ME should be her cause of death. The coroner stated that all her gastrointestinal issues were a result of a hypersensitive gut which was caused by ME, so ME is ultimately responsible for her death. Merryn is the second person, and the youngest, in the UK after Sophia Mirza to have ME listed as cause of death. Her family hope the case will show how severe ME can be and that it can help sufferers of ME receive better understanding from the medical profession, and for more UK biomedical research to be conducted. [1]

Her story was featured in the BBC Newsbeat documentary, M.E. and Me. Her family also have a Facebook page in her memory where they raise awareness for ME called Merryn's Legacy.

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Regarding Merryn's inquest:

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The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history