White matter

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White matter refers to areas of the central nervous system (CNS) that are mainly made up of myelinated axons, through which messages pass.

In human disease[edit | edit source]

ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

Mastocytosis[edit | edit source]

Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome[edit | edit source]

In 2016, a study done in France with 59 EDS patients found 36 (61%) had lesions in the white matter of their brain, potentially indicative of physical trauma. If the physical trauma happened before age 18, patient had more lesions of the reticular formation. The study authors used their findings to theorize that physical trauma could bring an onset of EDS. [1]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Hamonet, Claude; Frédy, Daniel; Lefèvre, Jérémie H.; Bourgeois-Gironde, Sacha; Zeitoun, Jean-David (Apr 22, 2016). "Brain injury unmasking Ehlers-Danlos syndromes after trauma: the fiber print". Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases. 11: 45. doi:10.1186/s13023-016-0428-9. ISSN 1750-1172. PMC 4840856Freely accessible. PMID 27102338. 

central nervous system (CNS) - One of the two parts of the human nervous system, the other part being the peripheral nervous system. The central nervous system consists of the brain and spinal cord, while the peripheral nervous system consists of nerves that travel from the central nervous system into the various organs and tissues of the body.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

mastocytosis - A type of mast cell disease in which chronic symptoms are related to overproduction or over-accumulation of mast cells. Not to be confused with Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS), where there are normal numbers of mast cells, but abnormal activity.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.