Thyroid gland

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The thyroid is an endocrine gland in the neck. It secretes thyroid hormones, which regulate the body's rate of metabolism, and calcitonin, a protein that assists in calcium balance. The production of thyroid hormones is stimulated by thyrotropin or Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), which is produced by the pituitary.

Types of thyroid hormones[edit | edit source]

Triiodothyronine and thyroxine are the two main forms of thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormones are partially comprised of iodine and a deficiency of iodine in the diet can lead to decreased production of these hormones. If left uncorrected the thyroid tissue can enlarge, resulting in a pronounced swelling in the neck, called a 'simple goitre.'[1]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2007, Thyroid malignancy association with cortical & subcortical brain SPECT changes in patients presenting with a myalgic encephalomyelitis / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[2](Abstract)
  • 2018, Higher Prevalence of “Low T3 Syndrome” in Patients With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Case–Control Study[3](Full Text)

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMHT0024712/
  2. Hyde, Byron; Leveille, Jean; Vaudrey, Sheila; Green, Tracy (2007). "Thyroid malignancy association with cortical & subcortical brain SPECT changes in patients presenting with a myalgic encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". ALASBIMN Journal. 38 (42): 18. 
  3. Ruiz-Núñez, Begoña; Tarasse, Rabab; Vogelaar, Emar F.; Janneke Dijck-Brouwer, D. A.; Muskiet, Frits A. J. (2018), "Higher Prevalence of "Low T3 Syndrome" in Patients With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Case–Control Study", Frontiers in Endocrinology, 9: 97, doi:10.3389/fendo.2018.00097, PMID 29615976 

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.