Michael Shelanski

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Source:sklad.cumc.columbia.edu

Michael Shelanski, M.D., Ph.D., was a panel member and contributed his expertise to the February 2015, Institute of Medicine report, Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Redefining an Illness.

The following biographical sketch is from Appendix E of the Institute of Medicine report, Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Redefining an Illness. [1]

"Michael Shelanski, M.D., Ph.D., serves as chairman of the department of pathology and cell biology at Columbia University, co-director of the Taub Institute, and director of the Medical Scientist Training Program. He is a member of the American Society for Cell Biology, the American Society for Investigative Pathology, the Association of American Physicians, and the IOM. Dr. Shelanski’s laboratory has been responsible for the identification and purification of several of the major cytoskeletal proteins and has served as a training ground for a number of outstanding scholars of the neurodegenerations. The laboratory is using a combination of cell biological and molecular biological approaches to unravel the pathways of “cell suicide” or apoptosis in Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerations, to understand the alterations in gene expression that occur in these diseases, and to dissect the regulation of synaptic responses in these diseases."[2]

Honors and Awards[edit | edit source]

  • 1970-1971, 1973-1974 National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Teacher-investigator Award
  • 1973-1974 Guggenheim Foundation Fellow
  • 1995-2001 Jacob Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award
  • 1999-present Member, Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences
  • 2013- Distinguished Service Award from the University of Chicago

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.