Iceland moss

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Cetraria islandica L. Ach or Lichen islandicus or Iceland moss or Iceland lichen is an edible moss used as a food supplement, and for making soaps and cold creams.[1][2]

Iceland moss has been analysed and found to contain the compounds:

  • protolichesterinic acid
  • lichesterinic acid
  • protocetraric acid and
  • fumarprotocetraric acid[3]

Analysis suggests that these compounds may be active on the targets of trypanosoma brucei, the parasite that causes African sleeping sickness - these targets are riboflavin kinase, sterol-14α-demethylase (CYP51), rohedsain and glutathione synthetase.[3]

Theory[edit | edit source]

Evidence[edit | edit source]

The European Medicines Agency has stated there is enough evidence for the use of Iceland moss for agent for treating mouth and throat irritation and associated dry cough, and for temporary loss of appetite in adults, adolescents and children aged over six years-old.[4]

Freysdottir et al (2008) found that Iceland Moss had anti-inflammatory properties and acted as an immunomodulator in rats and human cells.[5] It may also have antioxidant effects.[6]

Clinicians[edit | edit source]

Risks and safety[edit | edit source]

Costs and availability[edit | edit source]

It is available in powdered form aa a supplement.

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "Iceland moss | lichen". Britannica. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  2. "Iceland Moss". WebMD. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  3. 3.03.1 Ogbaji Igoli, John; Irvine Gray, Alexander; Jean Clements, Carol; Kantheti, Poorna; Kumar Singla, Rajeev (April 1, 2014). "Antitrypanosomal Activity & Docking Studies of Isolated Constituents from the Lichen Cetraria islandica: Possibly Multifunctional Scaffolds". Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry. 14 (8): 1014–1021.
  4. https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/medicines/herbal/lichen-islandicus"Lichen islandicus". European Medicines Agency. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  5. Freysdottir, J.; Omarsdottir, S.; Ingólfsdóttir, K.; Vikingsson, A.; Olafsdottir, E. S. (March 2008). "In vitro and in vivo immunomodulating effects of traditionally prepared extract and purified compounds from Cetraria islandica". International Immunopharmacology. 8 (3): 423–430. doi:10.1016/j.intimp.2007.11.007. ISSN 1567-5769. PMID 18279796.
  6. Gülçin, İlhami; Oktay, Münir; Küfrevioğlu, Ö. İrfan; Aslan, Ali (March 1, 2002). "Determination of antioxidant activity of lichen Cetraria islandica (L) Ach". Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 79 (3): 325–329. doi:10.1016/S0378-8741(01)00396-8. ISSN 0378-8741.

immunomodulator An immunomodulator is a substance that affects the functioning of the immune system

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.