Help:Glossary

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This page explains how to add new entries to the English-language Glossary page. Glossary entries will be used to show pop-up explanations inside pages ("tooltips"), which allow people to view a glossary entry from any page that uses the term being defined, or any synonym of that term. Therefore, the more synonyms you specify for a glossary entry, the more helpful the glossary entry will be, as there will be more pop-up explanations inside pages for all the synonyms of the term being defined.

Adding a new glossary entry

1) You can add a new glossary entry in the Visual Editor by inserting the template "Glossary entry". The term being defined will usually start with a lowercase letter. Be sure to specify any abbreviations or synonyms, including different spellings, capitalizations, single/plural forms, or noun/verb/adjective forms. (These synonyms will not be visible on the Glossary page, but will be used to show pop-up explanations inside other pages.) The entry will look something like this on the Glossary page:

BPS model
BPS Model
Biopsychosocial model
biopsychosocial
Biopsychosocial
Biopsychosocial Model



BPS
biopsychosocial model
biopsychosocial model (BPS) - A school of thought, usually based in psychology, which claims illness and disease to be the result of the intermingling of biological, psychological and social causes. (Learn more: en.wikipedia.org)
  • biopsychosocial model (BPS) - A school of thought, usually based in psychology, which claims illness and disease to be the result of the intermingling of biological, psychological and social causes. (Learn more: en.wikipedia.org)

2) Unfortunately, there is no way to add a citation to a glossary entry in the Visual Editor. If you are familiar with the Source Editor, you can add citations inside the "Definition" box when editing a glossary entry. The simplest way to do this is to add <ref>www.somewebsite.com</ref> to the end of the "Definition".
3) If there are any important abbreviations or synonyms that should get their own glossary entry, you can add them by inserting the "Glossary see other entry" template. The entry will look something like this:

See also

Learn more

biopsychosocial model (BPS) - A school of thought, usually based in psychology, which claims illness and disease to be the result of the intermingling of biological, psychological and social causes. (Learn more: Biopsychosocial model me-pedia.org)

biopsychosocial model (BPS) - A school of thought, usually based in psychology, which claims illness and disease to be the result of the intermingling of biological, psychological and social causes. (Learn more: Biopsychosocial model me-pedia.org)

biopsychosocial model (BPS) - A school of thought, usually based in psychology, which claims illness and disease to be the result of the intermingling of biological, psychological and social causes. (Learn more: Biopsychosocial model me-pedia.org)

biopsychosocial model (BPS) - A school of thought, usually based in psychology, which claims illness and disease to be the result of the intermingling of biological, psychological and social causes. (Learn more: Biopsychosocial model me-pedia.org)

biopsychosocial model (BPS) - A school of thought, usually based in psychology, which claims illness and disease to be the result of the intermingling of biological, psychological and social causes. (Learn more: Biopsychosocial model me-pedia.org)

biopsychosocial model (BPS) - A school of thought, usually based in psychology, which claims illness and disease to be the result of the intermingling of biological, psychological and social causes. (Learn more: Biopsychosocial model me-pedia.org)

biopsychosocial model (BPS) - A school of thought, usually based in psychology, which claims illness and disease to be the result of the intermingling of biological, psychological and social causes. (Learn more: Biopsychosocial model me-pedia.org)

biopsychosocial model (BPS) - A school of thought, usually based in psychology, which claims illness and disease to be the result of the intermingling of biological, psychological and social causes. (Learn more: Biopsychosocial model me-pedia.org)

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.