Gordon Parish

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J. Gordon Parish, M.D., F.R.C.P.(C), D. Phys. Med, (1825 - Sept 13, 2017)[1] worked at Passmore Edwards Medical Rehabilitation Centre, Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, UK, and Department of Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, St. Mary's Hospital, Colchester, Essex, UK.

Dr. Parish organized pre-80's data on the outbreaks and epidemics of illnesses they may have been Myalgic Encephalomyelitis or a variant of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.[2]

Outline by Dr Parrish of outbreaks from 1943-1980 (pdf) [3] (This link will take you to another page where you must click the ME-Research-UK-Research-Publications-on-ME-epidemics-1934-1980.pdf link.)

Journal articles[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. http://www.meresearch.org.uk/news/dr-gordon-parish-an-appreciation/
  2. http://www.bmj.com/rapid-response/2011/10/30/bcdc
  3. ME Research UK organization
  4. Parish J.G. (1970) Epidemic malaise. British Medical Journal, 3 (5713): 47–48. PMID:4316803 PMC1700986
  5. Parish, JG (Jun 1973), "Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis", Britsh Journal of Psychiatry, 122 (571): 735, PMID 4716076 
  6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1610570/pdf/brmedj01975-0054b.pdf
  7. Ramsay, AM; Dowsett, EG; Dadswell, JV; Lyle, WH; Parish, JG (May 21, 1977), "Icelandic disease (benign myalgic encephalomyelitis or Royal Free disease)", British Medical Journal, 1 (6072): 1350, PMID 861618 
  8. Parish JG. (1978) Royal free disease: worldwide outbreaks. Nursing Times, 74 (17):699-701.PMID:652543
  9. Parish, J.G. (November 1978), "Early outbreaks of 'epidemic neuromyasthenia'.", Postgraduate Medical Journal, 54 (637): 711-717, PMID 370810 
  10. Parish JG. (1981) Myalgic encephalomyelitis. Lancet, 1 (8226):950-1. PMID:6112360

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.