Carolyn Wilshire

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Carolyn Wilshire, PhD., is a Senior Lecturer at Victoria University of Wellington, School of Psychology, Wellington, New Zealand. She specializes in Language, Aphasia, Cognitive Psychology, Neuropsychology, Cognitive Neuroscience.

Education[edit | edit source]

  • PhD - University of Cambridge
  • BSc - (Hons) Monash University

Notable studies/articles on ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Wilshire, Carolyn; Ward, Tony (2015), "Psychogenic explanations of physical illness: Time to examine the evidence", Psychological Science, 11 (5): 606–631, doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.1344.7125 
  2. Wilshire, Carolyn (2017), "The problem of bias in behavioural intervention studies: Lessons from the PACE trial", Journal of Health Psychology, 22 (9), doi:10.1177/1359105317700885 
  3. Wilshire, C; Kindlon, T; Matthees, A; McGrath, S (2017), "Can patients with chronic fatigue syndrome really recover after graded exercise or cognitive behavioural therapy? A critical commentary and preliminary re-analysis of the PACE trial", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 5 (1): 43-56, doi:10.1080/21641846.2017.1259724 
  4. Wilshire, Carolyn; Kindlon, T; McGrath, S (2017), "PACE trial claims of recovery are not justified by the data: a rejoinder to Sharpe, Chalder, Johnson, Goldsmith and White", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 5 (1): 62-67, doi:10.1080/21641846.2017.1259724 
  5. Wilshire, C; Kindlon, T; Courtney, R; Matthees, A; Tuller, D; Geraghty, K; Levin, B (2018), "Rethinking the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome—A reanalysis and evaluation of findings from a recent major trial of graded exercise and CBT", BMC Psychology, 6 (6), doi:10.1186/s40359-018-0218-3 

Myalgic encephalomyelitis or chronic fatigue syndrome, often used when both illnesses are considered the same.

"Bias in research is "a systematic deviation of an observation from the true clinical state" (Sackett et al., 1986).[1]

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.