Cell danger response

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Cell danger response (CDR) is the evolutionarily conserved metabolic response that protects cells and hosts from harm. It is triggered by encounters with chemical, physical, or biological threats that exceed the cellular capacity for homeostasis.[1] In a 2016 paper by Naviaux , et al, the researchers "found that the direction of CFS abnormalities was opposite to metabolic syndrome and opposite to the metabolic response to infection, inflammation, or environmental stress that has been called the CDR...For example, cholesterol, phospholipid, sphingolipid, and purine metabolism are all decreased in CFS and dauer but are increased in metabolic syndrome and the stereotyped CDR."[2]

Highlights[edit]

Metabolic features of the cell danger response paper by Robert Naviaux includes the following bullet points:[3]

• The Cell Danger Response (CDR) is defined in terms of an ancient metabolic response to threat.

• The CDR encompasses inflammation, innate immunity, oxidative stress, and the ER stress response.

• The CDR is maintained by extracellular nucleotide (purinergic) signaling.

• Abnormal persistence of the CDR lies at the heart of many chronic diseases.

• Antipurinergic therapy (APT) has proven effective in many chronic disorders in animal models.

Learn more[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Metabolic features of the cell danger response. NCBI - NLM - NIH
  2. Naviaux, Robert K; Naviaux, Jane C.; Lia, Kefeng; Bright, A. Taylor; Alaynicka, William A.; Wang, Lin; Baxter, Asha; Nathan, Neil; Anderson, Wayne; Gordon, Eric (2016), "Metabolic features of chronic fatigue syndrome", PNAS, 113 (37), doi:10.1073/pnas.1607571113 
  3. Metabolic features of the cell danger response. Elsevier - Robert K. Naviaux


The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history