Biotin

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Biotin (Vitamin B7) is a water soluble, B-complex vitamin. It plays a key role in the metabolism of lipids, proteins and carbohydrates.

It is a critical co-enzyme of five carboxylases: acetyl-Coenzyme A carboxylase 1 and acetyl Co-enzyme A carboxylase 2,; propionyl Co-enzyme A carboxylase; β-methylcrotonyl Co-enzyme A carboxylase; and pyruvate Co-enzyme A carboxylase.

Deficiency[edit]

Over deficiency is rare but can develop with prolonged consumption of raw egg whites total intravenous nutritional support lacking biotin. Women may develop subclinical biotin deficiency during pregnancy. Anticonvulsants increase the risk of Biotin deficiency.[1]

Chronic fatigue syndrome[edit]

Other diseases[edit]

High dose biotin is currently being studied in Multiple sclerosis.[2][3]

Learn more[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/vitamins/biotin
  2. https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02220244?term=NCT02220244&rank=1
  3. https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02220933?term=NCT02220933&rank=1


The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history