Aspirin

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Aspirin tablets with a glass of water

Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid, is a medication used to treat pain, fever, and inflammation.[1] For pain or fever, effects typically begin within 30 minutes. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and works similar to other NSAIDs but also suppresses the normal functioning of platelets.

Mast cell diseases[edit | edit source]

Aspirin may also be used as a mast cell stabilizer for people with MCAD or MCAS, but people with high prostaglandin levels must have this supervised by a physician.[2]

Side Effects[edit | edit source]

More commonly reported ones are:


More commonly reported ones in children are:


Less commonly reported ones are:

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "Aspirin". drugs.com. Retrieved Feb 17, 2021. 
  2. "Medications to Treat Mast Cell Diseases". The Mast Cell Disease Society. Retrieved Feb 16, 2021. 

platelet - (also known as a thrombocyte) A colorless disk-like blood cell that assists in blood clotting by adhering to other platelets and to damaged linings of blood vessels. Simply put, platelets clump together to form blood clots. (A blood clot is also called a thrombus.) People with low levels of platelets may have trouble with blood clotting, and may bleed easily from minor wounds.

platelet - (also known as a thrombocyte) A colorless disk-like blood cell that assists in blood clotting by adhering to other platelets and to damaged linings of blood vessels. Simply put, platelets clump together to form blood clots. (A blood clot is also called a thrombus.) People with low levels of platelets may have trouble with blood clotting, and may bleed easily from minor wounds.

adverse reaction - Any unintended or unwanted response to the treatment under investigation in a clinical trial.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.