Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Volume 5, Issue 2, 1999

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Titles and abstracts for the Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Volume 5, Issue 2, 1999.

Volume 5, Issue 2, 1999[edit | edit source]

  • Editorial, by Roberto Patarca
  • Differing Patterns of Cognitive Dysfunction and Heart Rate Reactivity in Chemically-Intolerant Individuals With and Without Lifestyle Changes

    Abstract - "The purpose of the present study was to compare specific neuropsychological, psychological, and family history patterns, as well as cardiovascular reactivity of three community-recruited groups of nonsmoking, nonalcoholic middle-aged individuals with and without the symptom of intolerance to low levels of environmental chemicals (CI). CI is a common symptom in chronic fatigue syndrome and fibro-myalgia. The groups included: (i) CI who had made associated lifestyle changes because of the CI (CI/LSC); (ii) CI who had not made such changes (CI); and (iii) normals without CI (N). All subjects underwent an evaluation session followed by two laboratory cognitive and psycho-physiological test sessions one week apart. The CI/LSC diverged from the other groups in exhibiting poorer performance on the Continuous Visual Memory Test (CVMT) in terms of more false alarms and fewer correct hits, but normal performance on a visuospatial test of divided attention (DAT). In contrast, the CI group showed progressively poorer performance on the DAT with practice, but were like the N on the CVMT. The CI group showed a complex sensitization (amplification) of heart rate response to the DAT over time. In addition, the CI/LSC had the highest rate of family histories of alcohol problems and of attention deficit disorder, as well as of antihypertensive medication treatment and self-reported past emotional/physical abuse. Taken together, the data suggest that individuals with CI comprise a heterogeneous population requiring careful definition of subtypes for future studies."[1]

  • Coping Differences Between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Sufferers and Their Carers

    Abstract - "The main objective of the present study was to describe the extent to which CFS sufferers and their carers reported to have used a number of coping strategies over the course of the illness, and to find out if reports of coping differed between groups of these. In addition, associations between married sufferers and carers were investigated. From a methodological point of view, the factorial structure and the usefulness of the Ways of Coping Questionnaire (Folkman & Lazarus, 1988) in CFS was studied. The results indicated no gender differences. There were also no differences between sufferers supported and not supported by a carer. However, the results indicated reduced coping responses of carer husbands. From a methodological point of view, the emergence of comparable factors for sufferers and carers, which were also closely related to the original emotion and problem-focused factors, suggested that the use of the questionnaire was appropriate. The importance of these findings for coping research and therapy are discussed."[2]

  • Stigma and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Abstract - "We predicted that the largely female population seeking relief from the incapacitating symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), an enigmatic illness, would feel stigmatized, and that attribution of CFS symptoms to psychological causes by physicians would contribute significantly to the CFS-related stigma. Most subjects scored high on measures of stigma: 95% had feelings of estrangement, 70% believed that others attributed their CFS symptoms to psychological causes, 77% coped by using an educational strategy (disclosure) and 39% saw a need to be secretive about their symptoms in some circumstances. Most subjects (77%) were labeled as ‘psychological cases’ by one or more of the physicians (mean = 8) consulted, but of the 4 stigma measures, only disclosure was related to physician labeling. Such factors as duration ofw illness and unemployment, dissatisfaction with spouse, and symptom severity correlated significantly with measures of stigma. That many physicians were reportedly ignorant or skeptical of CFS (male more so than female MD's) may influence attempts of CFS patients to legitimize their symptoms by disclosure and lead to high rates of health care system use."[3]

  • Latency Immunity and Therapy: A Clinical Study of Latent Epstein Barr Virus Incidence in 297 Idiopathic Chronic Fatigue Patients with Plausible Hypotheses

    Abstract - "Organ cells of the body retain an Immune Activity System comparable to protozoa. The cells' immunity memory templates are latent proteins, microbes, their toxins and chemicals (latentees). Excess latentees are detected and excreted by latency therapy. Their excretion induces immediate and/or delayed symptoms and signs recognized by the patient. Foreign latent materials (latentors) enter the body and bypass the natural immune system to be taken up selectively by organ cell groups. Active infection/disease and allergens (antigens) involve the natural immune system antibodies. Latent infection/disease and allergens (latentors) involve the Organ Cell Immunity as intracellular latentees. Clinical laboratory testing is inappropriate. This Clinical Anecdotal Study compiles 297 patients who obtained little or no relief from conventional and alternative medicine (duration: 63% > three years). Patients provoked symptoms to two or more of 16 viruses, in particular Epstein Barr Virus. Latency therapy (heat, saunas, massage, tolerated exercise and sweating during sleep, the auto-sauna) dilutions stimulated excretion until symptoms/signs cleared. The principals were Epstein Barr Virus 67.3%, 200 patients; 13 individual viruses 30.0%, 89 patients; non-viral 2.6%, 8 patients. Latency therapy < 50% improvement = 16.5%; 50% to 80% = 26.6%; 80% to 100% = 46.7%; failures = 11%. Fourteen patients gave positive Epstein Barr Virus serology. A latency immunity concept explains affected subjective symptoms and illnesses and offers a treatment which complements related medical therapies."[4]

  • Letter to the Editor by Audrius V. Plioplys[5]
  • The Philosophy of Pain: New Concepts

    Abstract - "This article examines the concept of physical pain and its relationship to philosophy within the context of ethics. The first question posing a problem is: should pain be added to or included in the list of the five senses? Whether sensation is present or not, pain does exist. Pain is part of the “immediate data of consciousness” dear to philosophers. Pain is at the heart of ontology, philosophy of the being and existential ontology, which places existence above essence. Pain is mine and teaches me that I exist. Pain conveys my existence more than thought. Why shouldn't we enrich Descartes's cogito? “I suffer, therefore I exist” rather than “I think, therefore I exist” or even “I am something which suffers” rather than “I am a thing which thinks” by Descartes. As pain is the witness of their existence, other beings resemble me. The use of physical pain to cause harm is the best transition towards the following question, that is, what is the relationship between pain and evil or harm? This is a question which is primordial and concerns philosophers, moralists and theologians. There is just pain which is harmful and is our enemy to be conquered. This would seem to be what philosophy has to teach those of us who are doctors fighting pain."[6]

  • Registry of Physicians with CFS/FM[7]
  • Information Regarding the Registry of Physicians with Chronic Fatigue, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Fibromyalgia[8]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Iris R. Bell, Richard R. Bootzin, Gary E. R. Schwartz, Carol M. Baldwin, and Faith Ballesteros. (1999). Differing Patterns of Cognitive Dysfunction and Heart Rate Reactivity in Chemically-Intolerant Individuals With and Without Lifestyle Changes. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 5, Iss. 2, pp. 3-25. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v05n02_02
  2. Susanne Ax. (1999). Coping Differences Between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Sufferers and Their Carers. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 5, Iss. 2, pp. 27-62. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v05n02_03
  3. Judith Green, Jennifer Romei & Benjamin H. Natelson. (1999). Stigma and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 5, Iss. 2, pp. 63-75. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v05n02_04
  4. R. Bruce Duncan. (1999). Latency Immunity and Therapy: A Clinical Study of Latent Epstein Barr Virus Incidence in 297 Idiopathic Chronic Fatigue Patients with Plausible Hypotheses. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 5, Iss. 2, pp. 77-94. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v05n02_05
  5. Audrius V. Plioplys. (1999). Letter to the Editor. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 5, Iss. 2, pp. 97-98. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v05n02_06
  6. Jean-Marc Nores. (1999). The Philosophy of Pain: New Concepts. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 5, Iss. 2, pp. 99-105. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v05n02_07
  7. Ellen Kleyman. (1999). Registry of Physicians with CFS/FM. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 5, Iss. 2, pp. 106. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v05n02_08
  8. Michael C. McGoodwin & Debra S. Buchwald. (1999). Information Regarding the Registry of Physicians with Chronic Fatigue, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Fibromyalgia. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 5, Iss. 2, pp. 107-110. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v05n02_09