Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Volume 10, Issue 2, 2002

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Titles and abstracts for the Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Volume 10, Issue 2, 2002.

Volume 10, Issue 2, 2002[edit | edit source]

  • Editorial by Roberto Patarca-Montero
  • Possible Triggers and Mode of Onset of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    "Abstract - To identify the possible triggering events of CFS, we collected data on 1546 CFS patients and 309 excluded fatigued patients. Using extensive present and past medical history and lab reports as close as possible to the date of onset, an attempt was made to identify the agents that could play a role in the disease process. Significant differences were found between the events at onset, between the Fukuda or Holmes definitions and a sudden as distinct from a gradual onset. We further found a series of subgroups of events that occurred at onset of CFS. Each of these onset event clusters was associated with an infectious event, blood transfusion or hepatitis B vaccination. In a large percentage of our study group an infectious event was combined with a non-infectious event. In summary, we can conclude that a number of different stressors and consequent immunological and neuroendocrinological changes can contribute to the onset of CFS."[1]

  • Subjective Sleep Quality and Depressive Symptoms in Patients with the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    "Abstract - Objectives: To evaluate subjective quality of sleep and depressive symptoms of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Methods: Adult patients, who met the criteria for CFS, were recruited by general practitioners in the Leiden area, The Netherlands. Age and sex-matched controls were recruited. Questionnaires were handed out to 59 patients and 56 controls. Results: CFS patients had a significant higher mean score than controls on the Groningen Sleep Quality Score (GSQS) and the Zung-index, i.e., worse sleep and depression scores. In the multivariate logistic regression model, the GSQS had an OR of 1.35 per unit score (CI: 1.07-1.70), and the Zung-index had an OR of 1.21 per unit score (CI: 1.10-1.33). Conclusions: In our study, CFS patients report more subjective sleep impairment and depressive symptoms than controls but these factors appear to be independent. The fact that only a minority of the CFS patients have depressive symptoms suggests it is unlikely that depression is the cause of CFS."[2]

  • Cytolytic Cells and Their Function

    "Abstract - Cytolytic cells play an important role in cellular immunity and their function is compromised in a subgroup of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. This review summarizes historical, methodological, clinical, therapeutic, and basic immunology aspects of cytolytic cells."[3]

  • Residential Rehabilitation Courses in the Self-Directed Management of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Preliminary Evaluation

    "Abstract - Residential rehabilitation courses in self-directed illness management offer a potentially useful patient-centered and multidis-ciplinary therapeutic option for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. A retrospective survey of the data from the courses run by Westcare UK between 1995 and 1998 was undertaken to give a preliminary evaluation of outcomes and acceptability. The outcome results, for 49 participants, show improvements, at 12 months, on the Fatigue and Emotional Distress subscales of the PFRS. (Fatigue: before course: mean 3.66, s.d. 1.14; 12 months later: mean 3.11, s.d. 1.57; F(l,48) = 11.19 p < 0.005. Emotional distress: before course: mean 2.53, s.d. 1.46; 12 months later: mean 2.04, s.d. 1.39; F(l, 48) = 5.96 p < 0.01.) Participants also reported a high level of general satisfaction with the course: 89.4% gave a rating of five or six, out of six. These results describe both long and short-term benefits, and support the continued use of these courses and the implementation of a further more rigorous Study."[4]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. P. De Becker, N. McGregor & K. De Meirleir. (2002). Possible Triggers and Mode of Onset of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 10, Iss. 2, pp. 3-18. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v10n02_02
  2. A. W. Graffelman, A. Knuistingh Neven, L. Nagelkerken, H. Petri & M. P. Springer. (2002). Subjective Sleep Quality and Depressive Symptoms in Patients with the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 10, Iss. 2, pp. 19-28. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v10n02_03
  3. Roberto Patarca-Montero. (2002). Subjective Sleep Quality and Depressive Symptoms in Patients with the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 10, Iss. 2, pp. 29-58. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v10n02_04
  4. Simon Harrison, Andy Smith & Richard Sykes. (2002). Residential Rehabilitation Courses in the Self-Directed Management of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Preliminary Evaluation. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 10, Iss. 2, pp. 59-65. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v10n02_05