Staphylococcus aureus

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Staphylococcus aureus is a gram positive bacteria that is a member of the Firmicutes phylum. It is found in 30% of the human population. It is often commensal but can sometimes causes disease, including infections of the skin and endocarditis. It also commonly colonizes the human gut.[1][2][3] and can also colonize the nose.[4][5]


Possible biochemical effects[edit]

S. aureus produce coagulase, an enzyme that causes blood clotting.

The presence of S. aureus in a model of the human gut decreased the production of butyrate.[6]

Staphyloccocus bacteria produce alpha toxin[7]

In chronic disease[edit]

Higher levels of S. aureus was found in the mouths of patients with Sjogren's syndrome.[8]. A higher prevalence was also found in patients with irritable bowel syndrome,[9] and is implicated in traumatic brain injury.[10]

Probiotics[edit]

Several probiotics were found to reduce adhesion of S. aureus to the human gut including Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii.[11]

Herbs[edit]

Herbs shown to inhibit S. aureus include Bacopa monnieri,[12] green tea extracts,[13] turmeric,[14] milk thistle,[15] nigella,[16], cinnamon,[17] and shrubby sophora.[18][19][20] This may suggest a role for equilibrant and protandim in the control of S. aureus.

Mastic gum also has anti-S. aureus activity.[21]

See also[edit]

Learn more[edit]

References[edit]

  1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21073631
  2. http://jcm.asm.org/content/42/2/530
  3. http://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/204/5/714.full
  4. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10096-008-0602-7#/page-1
  5. http://scienceblogs.com/mikethemadbiologist/2007/10/25/staphylococcus-aureus-dont-pic/
  6. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0023227
  7. Reference needed
  8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11361180
  9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21518462
  10. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1794101
  11. http://www.microbiologyresearch.org/docserver/fulltext/micro/152/6/1819.pdf?expires=1454912338&id=id&accname=guest&checksum=1EB892A5BD5082CF81469F765E3F9B5D
  12. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Bacopa+monniera+Staphylococcus
  13. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25284935
  14. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26329948
  15. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21491604
  16. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25518302
  17. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25369660
  18. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1169149/
  19. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17137127
  20. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ptr.2650040607/abstract
  21. Antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of mastic gum (Pistacia lentiscus var. chia) on Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria in broth and in Model Food System, Chrysoula C. Tassou, a, G.J.E. Nychasb, International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation


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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history