Stanchi: Vivere con la Sindrome da Fatica Cronica

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Stanchi: Vivere con la Sindrome da Fatica Cronica
Stanchi.jpeg
Editor Giada Da Ros
Country Italy
Language Italian
Subject Biography, personal experience
Genre Medical
Publisher SBC Edizioni
Publication date
2012
Media type print
Pages 250
ISBN 978-8863472776

Stanchi: Vivere con la Sindrome da Fatica Cronica(Weary: Living with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome), edited by Giada Da Ros, is an Italian collection of personal essays written by patients living with CFS/ME. The foreword is by Dr. Umberto Tirelli.[1]

Publisher's synopsis[edit | edit source]

(This synopsis was provided by the publisher for promotional purposes. For book reviews, please see Links section below.)

"CFS: the good news is that you do not die... the bad news is that you do not die."Blake Edwards

A journey to discover myalgic encephalomyelitis, or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Giada Da Ros, graduated in Law, journalist, and president of the Italian CFS Association has collected a number of touching testimonials from patients who tell their own relationship with this still largely unknown disease in our country. The foreword is written by Umberto Tirelli.

Links[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Da Ros, Giada, ed. (2012), Stanchi: Vivere con la Sindrome da Fatica Cronica, Ravenna: SBC Edizioni, ISBN 978-8863472776 

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.