Sharni Hardcastle

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Source: ResearchGate

Sharni Lee Hardcastle, BBioMedSc (Hons1) PhD, is a researcher and Immunology Lecturer at National Centre for Neuroimmunology and Emerging Diseases, Griffith University, School of Medical Science, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.[1]

Awards[edit | edit source]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

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Online presence[edit | edit source]

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  1. https://www.griffith.edu.au/health/national-centre-neuroimmunology-emerging-diseases/our-team
  2. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Sharni_Hardcastle/info
  3. http://goldcoastwomeninbusinessawards.com.au/past-winners/
  4. "IACFS/ME Awardees". IACFS/ME. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  5. Brenu, Ekua W; van Driel, Mieke L; Staines, Donald R; Ashton, Kevin J; Hardcastle, Sharni L; Keane, James; Tajouri, Lotti; Peterson, Daniel; Ramos, Sandra B; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya M (2012), "Longitudinal investigation of natural killer cells and cytokines in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis", Journal of Translational Medicine, 10: 88, doi:10.1186/1479-5876-10-88
  6. Brenu, Ekua W; van Driel, Mieke L; Staines, Donald R; Kreijkamp-Kaspers, Sanne; Hardcastle, Sharni L; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya M (2012), "The Effects of Influenza Vaccination on Immune Function in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis" (PDF), International Journal of Clinical Medicine, 3 (6): 544-551, doi:10.4236/ijcm.2012.36098
  7. Brenu, EW; Huth, TK; Hardcastle, SL; Fuller, K; Kaur, M; Johnston, S; Ramos, S; Staines, D; Marshall-Gradisnik, S (2014), "The Role of adaptive and innate immune cells in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis", International Immunology, 26 (4): 233-42, doi:10.1093/intimm/dxt068, PMID 24343819
  8. Huth, Teilah K.; Brenu, Ekua; Nguyen, Thao; Hardcastle, Sharni L.; Johnston, Samantha; Ramos, Sandra; Staines, Donald R.; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya M. (2014), "Characterization of Natural Killer Cell Phenotypes in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis", Journal of Clinical & Cellular Immunology, 5 (3), doi:10.4172/2155-9899.1000223
  9. Hardcastle, Sharni Lee; Brenu, Ekua Weba; Johnston, Samantha; Nguyen, Thao; Huth, Teilah; Kaur, Manprit; Ramos, Sandra; Salajegheh, Ali; Staines, Donald R; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya (2014), "Analysis of the Relationship between Immune Dysfunction and Symptom Severity in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME)", Journal of Clinical & Cellular Immunology, 5 (190), doi:10.4172/2155-9899.1000190
  10. Hardcastle, SL; Brenu, EW; Johnston, S; Nguyen, T; Huth, T; Wong, N; Ramos, S; Staines, DR; Marshall-Gradisnik, SM (2015), "Serum Immune Proteins in Moderate and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients", International Journal of Medical Sciences, 12 (10): 764-772, doi:10.7150/ijms.12399
  11. Hardcastle, SL; Brenu, EW; Johnston, S; Nguyen, T; Huth, T; Wong, N; Ramos, S; Staines, DR; Marshall-Gradisnik, SM (2015), "Characterisation of cell functions and receptors in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME)", BMC Immunology, 16 (35), doi:10.1186/s12865-015-0101-4
  12. Hardcastle, Sharni Lee; Brenu, Ekua Weba; Johnston, Samantha; Nguyen, Thao; Huth, Teilah; Ramos, Sandra; Staines, Donald; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya (2015), "Longitudinal analysis of immune abnormalities in varying severities of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis patients", Journal of Translational Medicine, 13 (299), doi:10.1186/s12967-015-0653-3
  13. Nguyen, T.; Hardcastle, S.; Clarke, L.; Smith, P.; Staines, D.; Marshall-Gradisnik, S. (2017), "Impaired calcium mobilization in natural killer cells from chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis patients is associated with transient receptor potential melastatin 3 ion channels", Clinical and Experimental Immunology, 187 (2): 284–293, doi:10.1111/cei.12882
  14. https://www.griffith.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/566118/CFS-Symposium-2013-Program.pdf
  15. http://internationalstudentresearch.com/previous-forums/
  16. https://www.griffith.edu.au/health/national-centre-neuroimmunology-emerging-diseases/news-and-events

serum The clear yellowish fluid that remains from blood plasma after clotting factors have been removed by clot formation. (Blood plasma is simply blood that has had its blood cells removed.)

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.