Renee Taylor

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Renee R. Taylor, PhD is a licensed clinical psychologist and professor of occupational therapy at University of Illinois at Chicago, Illinois.[1] She is director of the University of Illinois Model of Human Occupation Clearinghouse.[2]

Education[edit]

  • 1997 - PhD, Clinical-Community Psychology, De Paul University, 1997[3]
  • 1995 - MA, Clinical-Community Psychology, De Paul University, 1995[4]
  • 1992 - BA, Psychology, Northwestern University, 1992[5]

Books[edit]

Notable studies[edit]

  • 2016, Illness progression in chronic fatigue syndrome: a shifting immune baseline[8]
  • 2016, Tracking post-infectious fatigue in clinic using routine Lab tests.
    ABSTRACT:"BACKGROUND: While biomarkers for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are beginning to emerge they typically require a highly specialized clinical laboratory. We hypothesized that subsets of commonly measured laboratory markers used in combination could support the diagnosis of post-infectious CFS (PI-CFS) in adolescents following infectious mononucleosis (IM) and help determine who might develop persistence of symptoms. METHODS: Routine clinical laboratory markers were collected prospectively in 301 mono-spot positive adolescents, 4 % of whom developed CFS (n = 13). At 6, 12, and 24 months post-diagnosis with IM, 59 standard tests were performed including metabolic profiling, liver enzyme panel, hormone profiles, complete blood count (CBC), differential white blood count (WBC), salivary cortisol, and urinalysis....RESULTS: Lower ACTH levels at 6 months post-IM diagnosis were highly predictive of CFS (AUC p = 0.02). ACTH levels in CFS overlapped with healthy controls at 12 months, but again showed a trend towards a deficiency at 24 months. Conversely, estradiol levels depart significantly from normal at 12 months only to recover at 24 months (AUC p = 0.02). Finally, relative neutrophil count showed a significant departure from normal at 24 months in CFS (AUC p = 0.01). Expression of these markers evolved differently over time between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary results suggest that serial assessment of stress and sex hormones as well as the relative proportion of innate immune cells measured using standard clinical laboratory tests may support the diagnosis of PI-CFS in adolescents with IM."[9]
  • 2014, Predictors of post-infectious chronic fatigue syndrome in adolescents
    "Abstract - This study focused on identifying risk factors for adolescent post-infectious chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), utilizing a prospective, nested case–control longitudinal design in which over 300 teenagers with infectious mononucleosis (IM) were identified through primary care sites and followed. Baseline variables that were gathered several months following IM, included autonomic symptoms, days in bed since IM, perceived stress, stressful life events, family stress, difficulty functioning and attending school, family stress, and psychiatric disorders. A number of variables were predictors of post-infectious CFS at six months; however, when autonomic symptoms were used as a control variable, only days spent in bed since mono was a significant predictor. Step-wise logistic regression findings indicated that baseline autonomic symptoms as well as days spent in bed since mono, which reflect the severity of illness, were the only significant predictors of those who met CFS criteria at six months."[10]
  • 2012, Cytokine expression profiles of immune imbalance in post-mononucleosis chronic fatigue[11]
  • 2012, Orthostatic Tolerance Testing in a Prospective Cohort of Adolescents With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Recovered Controls Following Infectious Mononucleosis
    Abstract - Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complex condition responsible for marked functional impairment. The authors recently reported that 6 months following acute infectious mononucleosis (IM), 13%, of adolescents met criteria for CFS. The authors’ objective was to assess standing orthostatic tolerance (SOT) in adolescents with CFS and in controls 6 months following IM. In all, 36 of 39 adolescents diagnosed with CFS 6 months following IM and 43 of 50 recovered controls had SOT testing (SOTT) performed. χ2 Analysis was performed to study the relationships between SOTT and the diagnosis of CFS. Adolescents diagnosed with CFS and recovered controls did not differ significantly in age, weight, or body mass index. The authors found that 9 of 36 adolescents with CFS (25%) versus 9 of 43 recovered controls (21%) had an abnormal SOTT, which was not a statistically significant difference. Adolescents who meet criteria for CFS 6 months following IM do not have, as a group, more standing orthostatic intolerance than recovered controls.[12]
  • 2010, Abnormalities in pH handling by peripheral muscle and potential regulation by the autonomic nervous system in chronic fatigue syndrome[13]
  • 2010, The occupational and quality of life consequences of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis in young people
    Abstract - Introduction: Chronic fatigue syndrome, termed myalgic encephalomyelitis in the United Kingdom (CFS/ME), is a debilitating condition involving severe exhaustion, cognitive difficulties, educational and vocational losses, and disruption of social activities and relationships. CFS/ME may affect volition (that is, value, interest and sense of competence). Purpose: To test Model of Human Occupation (MOHO) concepts by comparing young people with and without CFS/ME in terms of occupational participation, volition and health-related quality of life during infection and over time. Method: Three hundred and one people (12–18 years old) diagnosed with glandular fever were evaluated at the time of acute infection (baseline). Six months following diagnosis, 39 of them met the criteria for CFS/ME. A further 39 who recovered were randomly selected and matched to CFS/ME participants. Both groups were re-evaluated at 12 months and 24 months. The Occupational Self Assessment and the Child General Health Questionnaire were used to compare occupational participation. Results: Those with CFS/ME reported lower levels of perceived competency, more difficulties with physical functioning and poorer general health status than those who recovered. Conclusion: Those with CFS/ME report lower perceived competency, and compromises in physical functioning, school performance, social activities, emotional functioning and general health. This supports the MOHO assertion that impairments affect volition and quality of life.[14]
  • 2007, Service Utilization, Barriers to Service Access, and Coping in Adults with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    Abstract - Objective: In a sample of 47 adults with CFS, we aimed to describe patterns of service utilization, identify barriers to service access, and explore the relationship between service utilization and coping styles. Method: A questionnaire assessing service utilization frequency and barriers to service access was administered to a sample of 47 individuals with CFS. The Illness Management Questionnaire was used to assess relationships between coping styles and service utilization. Results: A Cochran's Q test of homogeneity revealed that medical and CFS self-help services were most frequently used and rehabilitation services were least frequently used. In terms of service accessibility,80.9% of participants reported at least one barrier. Lack of financial (including insurance) resources and lack of knowledge about service availability were the two most frequently reported. In terms of coping styles, symptom focusing was positively associated with use of CFS self-help services and with use of in-home services and social service agencies. Information seeking was negatively associated with use of in-home and social service agencies and with use of mental health services. Conclusion: These findings can be used by health-care professionals and advocacy-based organizations to develop programs focused on mass education campaigns for health-care providers, increase knowledge of service availability among individuals with CFS, and to understand relationships between certain types of coping styles and service preferences.[15]
  • 2006, Conservation of Resources and Quality of Life in Individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    Abstract - Objective: To examine the relationship between resources and quality of life in individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Participants and Study Design: A cross-sectional design was used to describe associations between resource loss and gain and quality of life for 47 individuals diagnosed with CFS. Main Outcome Measures: The Conservation of Resources Evaluation was used to measure resources in terms of perceived loss and gain. Health-related quality of life was assessed with the Quality of Life Index. Results: Total resource loss and total resource gain were significant correlates of overall quality of life. Gains in self-esteem, energy, and work resources were associated with higher-perceived quality of life. Material loss and energy loss were associated with lower-perceived quality of life. Conclusions: Findings for the relationships between perceived resources of self-esteem, work, material items, and energy and perceived quality of life can be used inform future rehabilitation efforts. These relationships appear to occur independently of illness severity among individuals CFS.[16]
  • 2003, An Approach to Persons with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Based on the Model of Human Occupation: Part One, Impact on Occupational Performance and Participation
    Abstract - Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a prevalent and disabling condition that involves six or more months of unexplained fatigue severe enough to interfere with previous levels of occupational, educational, and/or social performance. The fatigue is accompanied by at least four of eight additional physical and cognitive symptoms (Fukuda et al., 1994). This paper conceptualizes the multiple factors that affect occupational adaptation in persons with CFS. The Model of Human Occupation (MOHO) if used as a framework for understanding the synergistic and evolving relationships between motivation, roles, habits, performance capacities, and the environment as they influence individuals with CFS. Examples from the literature, autobiographical accounts, and from practice experience are used to illustrate the experience and impact of CFS on everyday life.[17]
  • 2003, Variability in diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome may result in substantial differences in patterns of symptoms and disability[18]
  • 2001, Measuring Attributions About Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    "Summary - Three studies explored the effects of different diagnostic labels and different types of recommended treatments for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome upon attributions regarding its cause, nature, severity, contagion, prognosis, and treatment. Attributions for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome appear to change based upon the diagnostic label given for the syndrome and the type of treatment recommended. Results suggest that, in comparison to the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome label, the Myalgic Encephalopathy label prompts attributions that this syndrome is a serious condition associated with a physiologically-based etiology, a poor prognosis, and decreased potential for organ donation. Results also suggest that, compared with cognitive coping skills treatment, treatment with ampligen appears to be associated with perceptions of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome as an accurate diagnosis and as a severely disabling condition."[19]
  • 2001, Subtypes of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Review of Findings
    "Summary - Most studies of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) have been based on patients recruited from primary or tertiary care settings. Patients from such settings might not be typical of patients in the general population and may not accurately reflect the heterogeneity among individuals diagnosed with this condition. The current paper reviews four community-based studies that examined subtypes of individuals with CFS. Distinctions between subtype groups based on sociodemographics, illness onset and duration, stressful precipitating events, symptom frequency, and comorbidity characteristics are made with respect to outcome measures of fatigue and symptom severity, functional ability, and psychiatric comorbidity.[20]
  • 2000, Chronic fatigue syndrome: sociodemographic subtypes in a community-based sample.[21]
  • 2000, Defining Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Methodological Challenges
    "Abstract - Accurate diagnosis of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is greatly complicated by the vague wording of many of the major diagnostic criteria (i.e., substantial reductions in previous levels of occupational, educational, social, or personal activities) and the absence of guidelines for health care professionals to follow. The lack of operationally explicit criteria has forced health care professionals to rely heavily on their own clinical judgement, which may be biased by personal and highly idiosyncratic factors. Thus, in the case of CFS, the lack of consensus among clinicians regarding the interpretation and application of the diagnostic criteria has likely produced problems in diagnostic reliability. Data from a recent community based epidemiologic study are presented to illustrate these problems and provide recommendations for improving criterion reliability."[22]
  • 2000, Chronic fatigue syndrome: an examination of the phases[23]
  • 1999, U.S. Case Definition of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Diagnostic and Theoretical Issues
    "Summary - In 1994, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed a revised case definition of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), a complex illness characterized by debilitating fatigue and a number of accompanying flu-like symptoms. Although Fukuda and associates intended to resolve complexities surrounding the classification of individuals with CFS stemming from previous definitional criteria, significant problems with the revised criteria endure. This article highlights reliability issues and other conceptual and operational difficulties inherent in the current U.S. definition of CFS. We employ case studies derived from a community-based epidemiological study of chronic fatigue syndrome to illustrate examples of the potential for misclassification of individuals with CFS using the current U.S. criteria. Moreover, we suggest alternative approaches to classification and ways to operationalize specific concepts embedded in the current U.S. criteria."[24]
  • 1997, A Screening Instrument for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Reliability and Validity[25]

Talks and interviews[edit]

Online presence[edit]

  • PubMed
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Website
  • YouTube

Learn more[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. http://ahs.uic.edu/occupational-therapy/directory/taylor-renee/
  2. http://www.cade.uic.edu/moho/
  3. http://ahs.uic.edu/occupational-therapy/directory/taylor-renee/
  4. http://ahs.uic.edu/occupational-therapy/directory/taylor-renee/
  5. http://ahs.uic.edu/occupational-therapy/directory/taylor-renee/
  6. Leonard Jason, Patricia A. Fennell and Renée R. Taylor. (2003) The Handbook of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome John Wiley & Sons Publishers. ISBN-10: 047141512X ISBN-13: 978-0471415121
  7. http://www.prpress.com/Clinicians-Guide-To-Controversial-Illnesses-Chronic-Fatigue-Syndrome-Fibromyalgia-and-Multiple-Chemical-Sensitivities-_p_51.html
  8. Russell, Lindsey; Broderick, Gordon; Taylor, Renee; Fernandes, Henrique; Harvey, Jeanna; Barnes, Zachary; Smylie, AnneLiese; Collado, Fanny; Balbin, Elizabeth; Katz, Ben; Klimas, Nancy; Fletcher, Mary Ann (2016), "Illness progression in chronic fatigue syndrome: a shifting immune baseline", BMC Immunology, doi:10.1186/s12865-016-0142-3 
  9. Harvey, Jeanna M; Broderick, Gordon; Bowie, Alanna; Barnes, Zachary M; Katz, Ben Z; O'Gorman, Maurice R; Vernon, Suzanne D; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Klimas, Nancy; Taylor, Renee (2016), "Tracking post-infectious fatigue in clinic using routine Lab tests.", BMC Pediatrics, 16 (54), doi:10.1186/s12887-016-0596-8 
  10. Jason, Leonard A; Katz, Ben Z.; Shiraishi, Yukiko; Mears, Cynthia J.; Im, Young; Taylor, Renee R. (2014), "Predictors of post-infectious chronic fatigue syndrome in adolescents", Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine, 2 (1): 41-51, doi:10.1080/21642850.2013.869176 
  11. Broderick, Gordon; Katz, Ben Z; Fernandes, Henrique; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Klimas, Nancy; Smith, Frederick A; O'Gorman, Maurice RG; Vernon, Suzanne D; Taylor, Renee (2012), "Cytokine expression profiles of immune imbalance in post-mononucleosis chronic fatigue", Journal of Translational Medicine, 10 (191), doi:10.1186/1479-5876-10-191 
  12. Ben Z. Katz, MD, Julian M. Stewart, MD, PhD, Yukiko Shiraishi, PhD, Cynthia J. Mears, DO, Renee Taylor, PhD. (2012). Orthostatic Tolerance Testing in a Prospective Cohort of Adolescents With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Recovered Controls Following Infectious Mononucleosis. Clinical Pediatrics. Vol 51, Issue 9, pp. 835 - 839. DOI:10.1177/0009922812455094
  13. Jones, David EJ; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Taylor, Renee R; Blamire, Andrew M; Newton, Julia L (Apr 2010), "Abnormalities in pH handling by peripheral muscle and potential regulation by the autonomic nervous system in chronic fatigue syndrome", J Intern Med, 267 (4): 394-401, PMID 20433583, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2796.2009.02160.x 
  14. Taylor, R. R., O’Brien, J., Kielhofner, G., Lee, S.-W., Katz, B., & Mears, C. (2010). The occupational and quality of life consequences of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis in young people. The British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 73(11), 524–530. http://doi.org/10.4276/030802210X12892992239233
  15. Sachi Thanawala & Renee R. Taylor. (2007). Service Utilization, Barriers to Service Access, and Coping in Adults with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 14, Iss. 1, pp. 5-21. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v14n01_02
  16. Taylor, Renée R.; Kulkarni, Supriya; Shiraishi, Yukiko (2006), "Conservation of Resources and Quality of Life in Individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome", Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, 13 (4): 3-15, doi:10.1300/J092v13n04_02 
  17. An Approach to Persons with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Based on the Model of Human Occupation: Part One, Impact on Occupational Performance and Participation Renee R. Taylor, Gary W. Kielhofner, Judith Abelenda, Kristen Colantuono, Terry Fong, Rose Heredia, Supriya Kulkarni, and Esmeralda Vazquez. Occupational Therapy In Health Care Vol. 17 , Iss. 2,2003. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/J003v17n02_04
  18. Jason, Leonard A.; Helgerson, Jena; Torres-Harding, Susan R.; Carrico, Adam W.; Taylor, Renee R. (March 2003), "Variability in diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome may result in substantial differences in patterns of symptoms and disability", Evaluation & the Health Professions, 26 (1): 3–22, ISSN 0163-2787, PMID 12629919 
  19. Leonard A. Jason & Renée R. Taylor. (2001). Measuring Attributions About Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 8, Iss. 3-4, pp. 31-40. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v08n03_04
  20. Leonard A. Jason, Renée R. Taylor, Cara L. Kennedy, Susan Torres Harding, Sharon Song, Danielle Johnson & Radhika Chimata. (2001). Subtypes of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Review of Findings. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 8, Iss. 3-4, pp. 1-21. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v08n03_02
  21. Jason LA, Taylor RR, Kennedy CL, Jordan K, Song S, Johnson DE, Torres SR. (2000) Chronic fatigue syndrome: sociodemographic subtypes in a community-based sample. Evaluations and the Health Professions, 23(3):243-63.
  22. Leonard A. Jason, Caroline P. King, Renee R. Taylor & Cara Kennedy. (2000). Defining Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Methodological Challenges. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 7, Iss. 2, pp. 17-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v07n03_03
  23. Jason, Leonard A; Fricano, Guy; Taylor, Renee R; Halpert, Jane; Fennell, Patricia A; Klein, Susan; Levine, Susan (2000), "Chronic fatigue syndrome: an examination of the phases", Journal of Clinical Psychology, 56 (12): 1497-508, PMID 11132566, doi:10.1002/1097-4679(200012)56:12<1497::AID-2>3.0.CO;2-Z 
  24. Leonard A. Jason, Caroline P. King, Judith A. Richman, Renee R. Taylor, Susan R. Torres & Sharon Song. (1999). U.S. Case Definition of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Diagnostic and Theoretical Issues. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 5, Iss. 3-4, pp. 3-33. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v05n03_02
  25. Leonard A. Jason, Michael T. Ropacki, Nicole B. Santoro, Judith A. Richman, Wendy Heatherly, Renee Taylor, Joseph R. Ferrari, Trina M. Haneydavis, Alfred Rademaker, Josee Dupuis, Jacqueline Golding, Audrius V. Plioplys, and Sigita Plioplys. (1997). A Screening Instrument for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Reliability and Validity. 'Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 3, Iss. 1, pp 39-59. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v03n01_04


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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history