Pyrroloquinoline Quinone

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Pyrroloquinoline Quinone or PQQ occurs normally in human tissue and certain plants, and is available as a natural supplement.[1][2] PQQ is believed to induce mitochondrial biogenesis.[2]

Potential uses[edit | edit source]

No established uses, although it has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects and may help with mitochondrion dysfunction and help modulate energy metabolism.[2]

Cusack Protocol[edit | edit source]

The Cusack Protocol, which was devised for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome involves using eight different supplements, including PQQ.[3][4]

Evidence[edit | edit source]

[1] No clinical trials of PQQ have involved ME/CFS patients.[2]

Risks and safety[edit | edit source]

Based on limited studies, PQQ appears to be safe, although this has not been confirmed in patients with ME/CFS.[2]

Costs and availability[edit | edit source]

PQQ is available over the counter.

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2018, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Chronic Disease: Treatment with Membrane Lipid Replacement and Other Natural Supplements[2] - (Book chapter)
  • 2013, Dietary pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) alters indicators of inflammation and mitochondrial-related metabolism in human subjects[1] - (Full text)]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.11.2 Harris, Calliandra B.; Winyoo, Chowanadisai; Mishchuk, Darya O.; Satre, Mike A.; Slupsky, Carolyn M.; Rucker, Robert B. (Dec 1, 2013). "Dietary pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) alters indicators of inflammation and mitochondrial-related metabolism in human subjects". The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. 24 (12): 2076–2084. doi:10.1016/j.jnutbio.2013.07.008. ISSN 0955-2863. 
  2. 2.02.12.22.32.42.5 Nicolson, Garth L.; Ferreira, Gonzalo; Settineri, Robert; Ellithorpe, Rita R.; Breeding, Paul; Ash, Michael E. (2018). "Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Chronic Disease: Treatment with Membrane Lipid Replacement and Other Natural Supplements". In Oliveira, Paulo J. Mitochondrial Biology and Experimental Therapeutics. Cham: Springer. pp. 499–522. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-73344-9_22. ISBN 978-3-319-73344-9. 
  3. Cusack, Deborah. "What Works?". EDS & Polysaccharides. Retrieved Oct 4, 2020. 
  4. Ehlers-Danlos Support Wilmington (Mar 10, 2016). "Cusack Protocol (slides)". facebook.com. 

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

mitochondria - Important parts of the biological cell, with each mitochondrion encased within a mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are best known for their role in energy production, earning them the nickname "the powerhouse of the cell". Mitochondria also participate in the detection of threats and the response to these threats. One of the responses to threats orchestrated by mitochondria is apoptosis, a cell suicide program used by cells when the threat can not be eliminated.

chronic disease - a disease or condition that usually lasts for 3 months or longer and may get worse over time

membrane - The word "membrane" can have different meanings in different fields of biology. In cell biology, a membrane is a layer of molecules that surround its contents. Examples of cell-biology membranes include the "cell membrane" that surrounds a cell, the "mitochondrial membranes" that form the outer layers of mitochondria, and the "viral envelope" that surrounds enveloped viruses. In anatomy or tissue biology, a membrane is a barrier formed by a layer of cells. Examples of anatomical membranes include the pleural membranes that surrounds the lungs, the pericardium which surrounds the heart, and some of the layers within the blood-brain barrier.

mitochondria - Important parts of the biological cell, with each mitochondrion encased within a mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are best known for their role in energy production, earning them the nickname "the powerhouse of the cell". Mitochondria also participate in the detection of threats and the response to these threats. One of the responses to threats orchestrated by mitochondria is apoptosis, a cell suicide program used by cells when the threat can not be eliminated.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.