Morris Papernik

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
Jump to: navigation, search
Source:ProHealth Physicians

Morris Papernik, MD, is a Internal Medicine physician and Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at UConn, Yale and Quinnipiac, Connecticut. He practices at ProHealth Physicians of Glastonbury, Connecticut and has a special interest in treating patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol, sleep disorders, headaches and osteoporosis.[1]

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee[edit]

Papernik served as a voting member of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee from 12/01/05 to 01/03/10.[2][3]

Notable studies[edit]

  • 2007, Q fever in an American tourist returned from Australia[4]
  • 2007, Non-pharmacologic interventions for CFS: a randomized trial[5]
  • 1998, Estimating the prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome among nurses
    Abstract - The present study assessed the prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in a sample of nurses. There is a paucity of studies on the prevalence of CFS in healthcare professionals. Two samples of nurses were recruited through mailed questionnaires. Data were collected on demographic characteristics and symptoms. In addition from the sample, those nurses with CFS-like symptoms were more comprehensively evaluated using a structured clinical interview and reviewing their medical records. A physician review team estimated the prevalence of CFS to be 1,088 per 100,000. These findings suggest that nurses might represent a high-risk group for this illness, possibly due to occupational stressors such as exposure to viruses in the work setting, stressful shift work that is disruptive to biologic rhythms, or to other possible stressors in the work settings (e.g., accidents).[6]
  • 1995, Estimating rates of chronic fatigue syndrome from a community-based sample: a pilot study
    Abstract - Most of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) epidemiological studies have relied on physicians who refer patients having at least 6 months of chronic fatigue and other symptoms. However, there are a number of potential problems when using this method to derive prevalence statistics. For example, some individuals with CFS might not have the economic resources to access medical care. Other individuals with CFS might be reluctant to use medical personnel, particularly if they have encountered physicians skeptical of the authenticity of their illness. In addition, physicians that are skeptical of the existence of CFS might not identify cases. In the present pilot study, a random community sample (N=1,031) was interviewed by telephone in order to identify and comprehensively evaluate individuals with symptoms of CFS and those who self-report having CFS. Different definitions of CFS were employed, and higher rates (0.2%) of CFS were found than in previous studies. Methodological benefits in using more rigorous epidemiological methods when estimating CFS prevalence rates are discussed.[7]

Clinic location[edit]

ProHealth Physicians of Glastonbury
320 Western Blvd., Suite 104
Glastonbury, CT 06033

Talks and interviews[edit]

Online presence[edit]

Learn more[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. https://www.prohealthmd.com/phpglastonbury/content/meet-our-team
  2. HHS.gov (2006), Nov 20 & 21, 2006 CFSAC Meeting (PDF) (Minutes) 
  3. HHS.gov (2009), May 27 & 28, 2009 CFSAC Meeting (PDF) (Roster) 
  4. Cohen, Nicole J., Morris Papernik, Joseph Singleton, John Segreti, Marina E. Eremeeva. (2007). Q fever in an American tourist returned from Australia. Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, Volume 5 , Issue 3 , 194 - 195. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tmaid.2006.09.002
  5. Jason LA, Torres-Harding S, Friedberg F, Corradi K, Njoku MG, Donalek J, Reynolds N, Brown M, Weitner BB, Rademaker A, Papernik M. Non-pharmacologic interventions for CFS: a randomized trial. Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings . 2007;14:275–296.
  6. Jason, LA; Wagner, L; Rosenthal, S; Goodlatte, J; Lipkin, D; Papernik, M; Plioplys, S; Plioplys, AV (1998), "Estimating the prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome among nurses", American Journal of Medicine, 105 (3A): 91S-93S., PMID 9790488 
  7. Jason, Leonard A; Taylor, Renee R; Wagner, Lynne; Holden, Jay; Ferrari, Joseph R; Plioplys, Audrius V; Plioplys, Sigita; Lipkin, David; Papernik, Morris (1995), "Estimating rates of chronic fatigue syndrome from a community-based sample: A pilot study", American Journal of Community Psychology, 23 (4): 557–568, PMID 8546110, doi:10.1007/BF02506968 


The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history