Mold hypothesis

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The mold hypothesis, in reference to ME/CFS, is that a severe reaction to mold or environmental exposure to it led to the symptoms and diagnosis of either ME or CFS. Although viral onset is thought to be at the most common trigger for ME/CFS diagnoses, it is believed some may have had a severe response to mold.

Theory[edit | edit source]

Evidence[edit | edit source]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

Analysis of this study by Cort Johnson sums up the following:

  • It’s impossible to say based on this study that mycotoxin levels or mold exposure is more prevalent in ME/CFS patients than the general population
  • It’s impossible to say that mycotoxins caused the illness present in the ME/CFS population
  • It is possible to say that mycotoxins are associated with severe illness and high rates of exposure to water based damage in this group pf patients.[2]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Brewer, Joseph H.; Thrasher, Jack D.; Straus, David C.; Madison, Roberta A.; Hooper, Dennis (2013), "Detection of Mycotoxins in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome", Toxins, 5 (4): 605-617, doi:10.3390/toxins5040605 
  2. Study Suggests Mold Exposure Can Cause Severe Effects in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) - Health Rising by Cort Johnson


The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history